Checking an E61 Espresso Machine for Scale - Page 2

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ChristianB

#11: Post by ChristianB »

erics wrote:Give the flange a gentle tap over the bolt holes with a piece of wood. If that doesn't do it, give it an equally gentle tap(s) in the horizontal direction.
It worked well. Thanks!
Christian B.

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nixter

#12: Post by nixter »

I have had my Giotto evo for almost a year now so I think it's time to check for scale. My tap water is some of the softest around (0.3 grains per gallon) I couldn't find a lower number in North America. Even so I run all my water through a Brita. Is the condition of the mushroom enough of an indicator of scale? If my mushroom looks clean should I just leave it another year?

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erics
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#13: Post by erics »

I would change that one year to six months. Another thing you can do is to time the warmup to a particular grouphead temperature, say 150F (or say,60 C) under reasonably similar ambient conditions. Make a note of the times and date it.
Skål,

Eric S.
http://users.rcn.com/erics/
E-mail: erics at rcn dot com

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nixter

#14: Post by nixter »

It took me a few tries figure out what you meant! So you're saying that scale will slow the warm up? Will it affect peak temp as read by your adapter? I've noticed that idle temp is down 2 degree F in the last few months. However that could be due to ambient temp.

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erics
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#15: Post by erics »

So you're saying that scale will slow the warm up?
Yes. Scale inherently affects the operation of all heat exchangers. Most (not necessarily espresso machines) are designed with SOME degree of scaling in mind but this varies with a whole host of other factors.
Skål,

Eric S.
http://users.rcn.com/erics/
E-mail: erics at rcn dot com

dougd

#16: Post by dougd »

I'm having some problems after I cleaned my mushroom.

I removed the mushroom, soaked it in a citric acid solution, poured a fully dissolved citric acid solution down the valve with a blind filter on, and let it sit overnight. After replacing the o-ring and gaskets, I put the mushroom back in and turned the machine on. I'm not getting any water if I turn on the pump though. I think the citric acid may have removed too much scale/chrome flakes, and it's clogging group?

What should the next steps be? Should I try more citric acid to see if it dissolves the remaining chunks? I'd like to remove the dispersion screw, but it's stuck on pretty hard so I'm going to have to get a draglink socket.

I should note I have the E61 solenoid group, not lever group.

dougd

#17: Post by dougd »

I took the whole group apart. It's not looking good :/

Any advice besides soaking the entire group in citric acid?

Solenoid:


HX valves:


Dispersion screw:


Lesson learned, do this before buying.

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erics
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#18: Post by erics »

Order some replacement silicon o-rings for the brew solenoid. Disassemble the brew solenoid valve - the cylinder that the solenoid is on should unscrew from the housing you pictured.
Skål,

Eric S.
http://users.rcn.com/erics/
E-mail: erics at rcn dot com

dougd

#19: Post by dougd »

Citric acid, Cafiza, and green scrubby pad did it some good.







With the mushroom back in.



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cannonfodder
Team HB

#20: Post by cannonfodder »

FYI, citric acid will do nothing for the coffee oils in the group head. It will break down calcite but you need a detergent to clean up the old coffee oils. Something like JoeGlo works wonders for that.
Dave Stephens