Breville Dual Boiler, five+ years on - Page 161

Need help with equipment usage or want to share your latest discovery?
BaristaBob
Posts: 1850
Joined: 6 years ago

#1601: Post by BaristaBob »

^^^ I feel your frustration. My BDB is exactly the same age, 7+ years, many repairs all DIY, even the pump. Had I not popped the top after the first year of ownership, it would have faced an untimely death. Owning a BDB comes with the caveat that you need to be a DIY'er to really enjoy what this machine offers. As your exploration into a replacement has revealed, to get similar features in a new espresso machine one will have to spend considerably more money...way more money!

A new BDB might hold up longer with the better fittings, time will tell. All machines, even the best, need some level of maintenance. The point at which your frustration exceeds your enjoyment is the time to move on. My short list includes...
LM gs3
Sanremo YOU
Synesso ES1
Rocket R9 One

Best to you on this journey.
Bob "hello darkness my old friend..I've come to drink you once again"

Nev
Posts: 1
Joined: 3 months ago

#1602: Post by Nev »

Do all semi-auto espresso machines require this much maintenance (particularly the o rings failing) and have this many issues with leaks?

I am coming from a cafelat robot which is very much maintenance free.

BaristaBob
Posts: 1850
Joined: 6 years ago

#1603: Post by BaristaBob replying to Nev »

Just my opinion (and I love my BDB), NO! It's made in China and for that you get great features on the cheap but constant failure of parts that most high end machines do not suffer from.
Bob "hello darkness my old friend..I've come to drink you once again"

User avatar
lancealot
Posts: 1135
Joined: 7 years ago

#1604: Post by lancealot »

Bob. I agree that this machine has a trade off between features for the price and frequency of required maintenance.
But...
I think that it is incorrect to attribute this situation to country of manufacture. I think that this is a result of product design and engineering. If we were dealing with manufacturing issues, there would be all kinds of inconsistent, random issues or just straight up faulty parts. The issues with this machine are consistent: a leaky steam and water path; electrical problems that occur due to a triac placed above a bunch of tubes that carry steam and suffer from leaks; software that makes a mistake and fries the steam boiler's thermal fuse during a software guided descale procedure; and a steam valve who's seals start to leak after 2-3 years. I argue that these are due to design and engineering choices by Breville.

User avatar
lancealot
Posts: 1135
Joined: 7 years ago

#1605: Post by lancealot »

Nev,
As Bob said, NO!

The tube, clip and o-ring situation is pretty unique to Breville. There are some super auto's that use this system too but we are not talking about them.

Breville has attempted to address this situation. Starting a few years ago, they replaced the clip + o ring design with a compression nut. However they are stilll using PTFE tube. You can find pics of the new design around here or on the web. People come to this thread all the time with o-ring issues, but in the past few years since they started with the compression nut scheme, I have only seen one issue with the compression nuts leaking on the HB forums. I have a clip + o ring BDB not a compression nut BDB so I cannot comment first hand on the design.

BaristaBob
Posts: 1850
Joined: 6 years ago

#1606: Post by BaristaBob »

lancealot wrote:Bob. I agree that this machine has a trade off between features for the price and frequency of required maintenance.
But...
I think that it is incorrect to attribute this situation to country of manufacture. I think that this is a result of product design and engineering. If we were dealing with manufacturing issues, there would be all kinds of inconsistent, random issues or just straight up faulty parts. The issues with this machine are consistent: a leaky steam and water path; electrical problems that occur due to a triac placed above a bunch of tubes that carry steam and suffer from leaks; software that makes a mistake and fries the steam boiler's thermal fuse during a software guided descale procedure; and a steam valve who's seals start to leak after 2-3 years. I argue that these are due to design and engineering choices by Breville.
Chris,
Yes, I have to agree with you. I was hasty in placing the blame on "made in China". Breville's design and engineering choices certainly appeared to be based on cutting cost in certain areas while providing a machine that could produce great espresso for the home barista. DIY'ers like you, me, and others can keep these machines running well since we understand the big problem areas, as you pointed out so well.
Bob "hello darkness my old friend..I've come to drink you once again"

BaristaBob
Posts: 1850
Joined: 6 years ago

#1607: Post by BaristaBob »

lancealot wrote:My hunch is that it is some kind of magnet.
Your "hunch" is spot on! Removed my water tank for a monthly cleaning and placed a horseshoe magnet against the disk. Sure enough it moves with the magnet. I suppose there is a magnetic trip switch inside the machine wall that is positioned at just the right position to activate when the disk drops to the bottom of the tank that should allow one last shot to be completed. As to why it would fail? I never allow mine to get this low before adding more water.
Bob "hello darkness my old friend..I've come to drink you once again"

smitkevi
Posts: 3
Joined: 2 years ago

#1608: Post by smitkevi »

My BDB is prob 7 or 8 years old, anyone else seen this? The tube from the boiler is black, normal/expected or concerning?