Breville Dual Boiler, five+ years on - Page 116

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gchapman
Supporter ♡

#1151: Post by gchapman »

Found this set of Breville Oracle steam probes overseas: http://spares.bigwarehouse.com.au/produ ... id=1777126

eReplacementParts indicated these were substitutes for the BDB probes. Anyone know if the Oracle steam boiler probes would be the same as the BDB probes?

If I can get a backup part, I'll do a teardown of the leaking probe - unless some Dow 111 plugs it. Would hate to make the leak worse in a teardown w/out a replacement on hand. Could disable the whole machine.

Geoff
Geoff Chapman

gchapman
Supporter ♡

#1152: Post by gchapman »

Didn't search enough on their website. They list the same steam probes (same part #) under the BDB920 as well: http://spares.bigwarehouse.com.au/produ ... id=1777126

Geoff
Geoff Chapman

pcrussell50

#1153: Post by pcrussell50 »

I gather from some people who own other machines, they just cut their own out of stainless rod. That said, you shouldn't really need to unless you have chloride corrosion. Even scale will clean off.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

grufromtheloo

#1154: Post by grufromtheloo »

So, someone on r/espresso had contacted Breville USA and they got a new set of probes for the brew boiler. Seeing this, I contacted Breville Canada and they are willing to ship me a new set of probes for the steam boiler. Both are for BDB. I assume Breville in most countries would have the same policies? The prices are really decent too. I suggested reaching out to Breville via email, just don't expect a fast response.

gchapman
Supporter ♡

#1155: Post by gchapman » replying to grufromtheloo »

Thanks for that. I'll call and see if I can get a timely response. Nice to know that there are several sources for these probes. A leaking probe, w the leak bypassing the main o-ring and coming from *inside* the sleeve could actually be a slow death sentence for the machine, and they are easy-peasy to replace.

I took apart my leaky probe today, removing the tiny c-clip that holds the ceramic sleeve on the top. Removing it only gives a mm or two of movement to the sleeve, sliding up and down the metal probe. To get the sleeve all the way off, you'd have to remove the soldered tab on top that mated with the wire. Didn't want to do that. I also took out a second probe to compare. There is something btw the probe and the sleeve that keeps it from leaking while letting it move a bit. Not able to discover how it seals. Was looking for a tiny o-ring or something...
Geoff Chapman

grufromtheloo

#1156: Post by grufromtheloo »

No worries. I'd love to know how these seal as well. My working theory is that when hot the metal expands and seals the opening. They may start leaking when the metal corrodes near the ceramic base and the corrosion prevents the sealing.

pcrussell50

#1157: Post by pcrussell50 »

gchapman wrote:Thanks for that. I'll call and see if I can get a timely response. Nice to know that there are several sources for these probes. A leaking probe, w the leak bypassing the main o-ring and coming from *inside* the sleeve could actually be a slow death sentence for the machine, and they are easy-peasy to replace.
When I had my probes out for cleaning a few weeks ago (some non-scale mineral buildup that wiped off with a wet washcloth), I saw no evidence of a mechanical seal. This and the positive experience of one of the lads in Great Britain who tried a small bead of silicone grease on the bottom of the ceramic, packed between the ceramic and the steel rod, leads me to my first guess that, this is precisely what Breville does. Silicone grease will not melt out at espresso temperatures and is even resistant to detergent to where if you get it on your clothes it will not come out in the wash, even on hot and with a hot load of detergent.

It would be a shame to replace perfectly good sensors if all it took was to put some silicone grease in the right place, especially if that's what Breville did all along.

That said, it is encouraging that some people are having success shaking Breville down for parts, even in the USA tort climate. This bears more exploration. I never seem to need Breville parts on my end. But if I ever did, it would be nice to know I could.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

grufromtheloo

#1158: Post by grufromtheloo »

I read about re-sealing with silicone grease as well. What doesn't make sense is how silicone grease would resist the pressure from the steam boiler and not be pushed out?

pcrussell50

#1159: Post by pcrussell50 » replying to grufromtheloo »

I think it has to do with the tight space it would have to creep up and the distance. In the same way a chicken egg without any micro cracks in it might be very hard to crush by hand.

At least that's my theory for now. Fully open to other suggestions though. :shrugs?

-Peter
LMWDP #553

gchapman
Supporter ♡

#1160: Post by gchapman »

I did get a hold of Breville USA today after waiting on the phone for an hour! In spite of a very bad connection I manage to explain my situation and my request for new steam probes. I fortunately had a part number off ereplacement.com, otherwise he would not have helped me.

In order to sell them to me I had to give up my right to have warranty work done on the machine. After owning it for a year, and with all you guys as my back up, I responded to his email with, "I accept". It sounds like Breville is wary of people messing with the internal parts of the machine and then coming to them for warranty repairs. Makes sense.

I don't know if I gave up at the same time the ability to send it back to them for their $299 and we fix it deal.

The part number is SP0001820, and the cost was only $17 shipped! I would've paid $100 to get them shipped from Australia!

Here is the email I had to affirm:

Consumer notice for spare parts:

Breville® does not recommend or endorse consumers diagnosing, disassembling or conducting internal repairs within the body or casing of a Breville® branded appliance. We recommend diagnosis, disassembly and repairs be done by properly trained and qualified technicians familiar with operations and dangers associated with the product and its collective components and assemblies. Anyone other than a trained and qualified technician diagnosing, disassembling or repairing a Breville® appliance does so at their own risk and releases Breville®, partners, employees, officers and affiliates from any and all liability and damage to product(s), person(s) or property. The shipment of parts and products by Breville® or any other distributor or reseller does not constitute an extension or modification to this statement or the original warranty period or terms and conditions supplied with the unit on the original date of purchase.



Geoff
Geoff Chapman