Breville Dual Boiler ball valve detail, pics - Page 9

Need help with equipment usage or want to share your latest discovery?
bhennessy

#81: Post by bhennessy »

Here is a US supplier of 1000 psi stainless ball valves. Not sure of the handle orientation as it can't be seen.
https://www.directmaterial.com/stainles ... i-wog.html
1/4" Stainless Steel (316) Mini Ball Valve - Female by Female NPT is 42mm

Same on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Steel- ... B006VE3C4A
Cheaper on Walmart https://www.walmart.com/ip/1-4-Stainles ... /873372894

bh

pcrussell50

#82: Post by pcrussell50 » replying to bhennessy »

It's important to note that the Breville ball valve uses BSPP threads (British Parallel Pipe). The pitch might match NP but the thread shape won't and you might get leaks if you try to use NPT or NPP on BSPP. I have heard that if you use a LOT of thread sealer it might work. Some folks in the turbo car hobbies have made mention of mixing British and American fittings as long as they have the same thread pitch, by slathering them in thread sealer. BUT...

...There are plenty of BSPP ball valves in the world. I would try those first if it were me.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

Windgoi

#83: Post by Windgoi »

That makes more sense on the shaft pushing through. let us know on how #8 seal works.

pcrussell50

#84: Post by pcrussell50 » replying to Windgoi »

Will do.

Did some more studying yesterday with a couple of brand new ball valves I have, as well as the one in my nearly brand new machine. So that makes three valves I have to play with:

1) I had the idea that it's a good idea to break the thread locker when the valve is new, so that it might be easier to service the valve later. This worked on two of my valves. The third one, I am at risk of stripping out the 6mm female hex if I try any harder to open it up. So be careful out there.

2) I think we are learning that at least after the first leak/drips start, there is a possibility that cracking open the valve internals, then re-tightening it a little tighter might stop the leaks for a little while longer.

3) Since PTFE cold flows... If you can't tighten the assembly stack any further, and you are still getting leaks, you might try flipping each PTFE seal so the bevel side faces outwards. This will put the un beveled side against the ball, and give you some more seal "tightness" to play with. I think it will eventually cold flow it's own new bevel again.

4) When you do tighten down attempting to regain a good seal, I think the key is that you need to feel a little drag on the ball when you actuate it. If it just spins easily, then the seals aren't pressing hard enough against the ball, to... seal. That's why trying number (3) above might work. Or doing what Rodger/Windgoi mentioned in his seminal first post, and using a nylon (or any thin) washer as a shim. The point is to get tighter contact of the seals against the ball.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

DaveB

#85: Post by DaveB »

I've been following this thread with interest, as my BDB steam wand started dripping after only 3 months (purchased March 2018). For the longest time it was just the occasional drip - very gradually increasing in frequency. A couple months ago I changed the settings so the machine would go into sleep mode but would not do the usual shutdown after 4 hours. This resulted in the machine being on (mostly in standby) for 12 hours or so a day. Before long the drip rate was GREATLY increased. Of course this could just be the natural progression of things and merely a coincidence. Thoughts?

Here's a typical amount I've been collecting lately - from this morning. Machine powered up at 5:30am, went into standby at 6:30am, and then I powered it up fully at 7:00am. Here's what was collected in those 90 minutes:



(that's just over 1.5 oz or approx. 47ml)

I will soon be sending it in, as I have a year left on the warranty. Part of me wishes I had done it sooner, especially if this is going to be a predictable, recurring theme. If leaving the BDB in standby mode all day is indeed responsible for the greatly increased dripping, then my advice would be to shut down the machine when not using it, as it still takes 3 or 4 minutes to come up to full temperature if its been sitting a while, vs only 8 minutes from a cold start. Not worth it if leaving it on will accelerate and worsen the leaking!
Von meinem iPhone gesendet

pcrussell50

#86: Post by pcrussell50 »

What you are brining up is something I have been thinking about over the last couple of months. And that is, that when there is pressure in the steam boiler, the only thing holding it back from coming out the steam wand is the teflon seals in the ball valve. When those become loose, and are no longer tight on the ball, drips will happen. The more time they spend having to hold back steam pressure, the more water you will collect in your cup.

Breville has been responding over the years with some minor repair/durability improvements, and the steam ball valve is an area needing attention. So if you are still on warranty, I highly encourage you to take advantage of that.

This is to take away nothing from my highly optimistic view that DIY leak fixes are just around the corner, if not already here.

If you were off warranty, I would recommend that you remove and disassemble your ball valve, and flip the Teflon seals and put it back together with some pressure on the ball. We already know that Rodger stopped his leak by shimming the Teflon seals so they regain pressure on the ball. Flipping the seals may well do the same thing. And eventually, new seals as well. I have some on order from China. Will be another month before they get here to try out.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

DaveB

#87: Post by DaveB »

I'm very tempted to open 'er up and try flipping the seal, etc, as it seems seems silly to send it in for such a relatively minor issue. But then again, there's the off chance that I might get a brand new machine, or perhaps one with an improved ball valve. Also, I happen to have an 11 year old Excobar Office Leva II DB to play with, so I will be practicing steaming with it to see if I can eventually get the micrfoam quality remotely close to the BDB. So far it seems to be a lost cause! :D
Von meinem iPhone gesendet

pcrussell50

#88: Post by pcrussell50 »

DaveB wrote:I'm very tempted to open 'er up and try flipping the seal, etc, as it seems seems silly to send it in for such a relatively minor issue.
That makes eminent sense. The reason I suggested getting it handled under warranty is that it will be another data point to motivate Breville towards a fix.

-Peter
LMWDP #553

User avatar
johnny4lsu

#89: Post by johnny4lsu » replying to pcrussell50 »

Peter, a little off topic, but do you know if Breville does anything to the units sent in beside the immediate problem sent in for? Seems as though they would automatically change o rings and other problematic future problems while the unit is in the repair bay. Just curious your knowledge of that.

pcrussell50

#90: Post by pcrussell50 » replying to johnny4lsu »

They say that they do. There is a list of things, somewhere. And o-rings and descaling is one of them. Shame is, o-rings are cheap and easy for us to do ourselves. And as of some time in 2018, they've gone to a new tube nut design for the boiler tops, which doesn't use o-rings... So that aspect may be moot going forward. Which is why the more they see of leaky ball valves, the more likely they are to do something about it. But again, in the end, the way this ball valve thing is shaping up, it's looking like a high probability of a successful DIY fix.

Once off warranty, if you save your "send it in" repairs for things other than the simple stuff like o-rings and ball valves, you are more likely to get a factory refurb or a brand new. Lately, they've been sending out brand new. Either way, all they want is your machine, so you can keep all your accessories and such. I drilled out a spouted portafilter, so now I have two bottomless and a spouted.

-Peter
LMWDP #553