Alex by Izzo - rotary pump you don't have to plumb in! - Page 8

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Psyd

#71: Post by Psyd »

lparsons21 wrote:Maybe Chris will see this and respond.
I have to say, this was the next machine to grace the butcher top of my dishwasher, but lacking answers to some of the more pertinent questions that have been raised here kinda knocked it off it's perch. I'm going to stay pro...
Espresso Sniper
One Shot, One Kill

LMWDP #175

lparsons21

#72: Post by lparsons21 »

All I can tell you is that I have exactly zero problems with my Alex and wouldn't hesitate recommending it to anyone wanting a machine in this class. It is solidly built, easy to get into to make any wanted adjustments, and appears to be easy to service.

Coupled with the fact that it produces a superb cup whether it is an espresso shot or cafe crema and the ability to steam in fine fashion and you have an excellent all around machine.

I would say that its single downside is size.
Lloyd

chriscoffee (original poster)
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#73: Post by chriscoffee (original poster) »

What is it you wish to know? I do not watch all the various web forums all the time. If you have any questions all one has to do is either call me or email me. There is no reason to put a hole in the side of the Alex to adjust the rotary pump pressure. First of all it would serve no purpose since you have to loosen the lock nut first before making an adjustment the same way you do on all rotary pumps. Second once you set it, it's set unless you have line pressure that varies greatly. In that case it would be recommended to install a regulator with gauge and set the pressure some where between 30 to 40 psi.
Chris Nachtrieb
Pres. Chris' Coffee Service, Inc.

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Psyd

#74: Post by Psyd »

chris wrote:What is it you wish to know? I do not watch all the various web forums all the time. If you have any questions all one has to do is either call me or email me. Second once you set it, it's set unless you have line pressure that varies greatly. In that case it would be recommended to install a regulator with gauge and set the pressure some where between 30 to 40 psi.
Hey Chris, thanks.
I've asked a few time (of the owners) about manufacturer's suggestions along the lines of 24/7 operation and all I got was a response that said, if I may paraphrase, "I wouldn't want something on at my house when I wasn't home". There was the question of NSF approval, and then, in regard to the pressure question, how much of a trick is it to unhook it from three or three and a half bar of line pressure and switch to the pourover tank? I would guess that it isn't the simple unplug and flip a switch that was discussed on another thread?
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One Shot, One Kill

LMWDP #175

chriscoffee (original poster)
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#75: Post by chriscoffee (original poster) »

I will be in my office all day tomorrow call me and I will be happy to answer your questions.
Chris Nachtrieb
Pres. Chris' Coffee Service, Inc.

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Psyd

#76: Post by Psyd »

As I understand it (Chris, jump in if I got anything wrong) these are the answers I was looking for:

The Alex Izzo is not approved for commercial use. This doesn't mean that it isn't qualified, it means that she hasn't been through the process. As far as I know, she probably won't. This is my guess. As the machine is really headed towards the higher end home use market, the added expense for a qualification that won't benefit the targeted market isn't warranted.

Changing from line pressure to pourover will change the group pressure somewhat, but not on a one-to-one basis. Estimations are a half-bar drop in pressure, with the caveat that it will depend on what that line pressure is to begin with. A half bar drop isn't that significant to me, and if it becomes so, it's easy to get to and adjust.

24/7 operation runs the risk of making a mess in the event of a Pressure stat failure (as they fail in the 'heat' or 'on' mode more often than not). Attempts at adjusting the deadband increases that risk of failure. I'd be willing to do an annual Pstat replacement to reduce that risk in exchange for having the thing available 24/7. Annual replacement will not guarantee that it wont fail, and neither will turning it off every day, as the Pstat is an electro-mechanical device and as such is subject to the entropic stresses that all moving parts are subject to, but its a conservative risk reduction. A bargain at twice the price in my estimation.

This is all my supposition based on the conversations that I had with Chris Nachtrieb at Chris' Coffee, and I may not have gotten everything spot-on, and there is a chance that I misunderstood completely. Do not call Chris and quote these words back to him, as they aren't his words. they are my best understanding of his words. He was very nice, very patient, and was willing to go to great detail to make sure that I was comfortable with the next machine that will grace the butcher top of my dishwasher, deposing my professional two-group.
Espresso Sniper
One Shot, One Kill

LMWDP #175