20-Amp On/Off Timer for Espresso Machine - Page 4

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BaristaBoy E61
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#31: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

Nunas wrote:Another distinction often made is that the moveable part of a "contactor", when open, is not connected to the circuit. It takes the form of a bar that is pulled down onto two contacts, completing the circuit.
Or, is the relay or contactor bar 'single throw' or 'double throw' :roll:
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"

Mike-R
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#32: Post by Mike-R »

I'm also interested in this contactor idea. I assume something like this 2 pole 20A 120V coil, coupled with a standard smart plug to power the coil, would do the trick?

Any suggestions on how to wire it up into a neat package? Usually these contactors are installed inside an AC unit or other equipment, but for an espresso machine I would prefer to keep it external.

Davi-L
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#33: Post by Davi-L »

A contactor would work for the task.
Suggest that you get it with a certified enclosure (box) to make it legal and safe. That also means bulk and remote mounting away from the machine.
Some come with overload buttons to allow a reset in case of over amperage. Be aware. Not required but most common.
They are loud. When they engerize and de-energize they can give off a loud bang/click/thunk.
For house hold use you may consider a solid state contractor. or called an SSR. Available in any amperage and can be triggered by as little as 3 VDC, or line voltage. Specify when ordering. They are silent. Often used with PID heater controls in espresso machines.
D.

Mike-R
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#34: Post by Mike-R »

I wonder if a pool timer would work well for this purpose. They are usually rated for 40 amp. There are plenty of wifi enabled ones on the market now.

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pizzaman383
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#35: Post by pizzaman383 »

I used a 20 amp pool timer (no WiFi) for years and it is still my backup. The 20 amp z-wave controllers I have used go bad after a couple of years - my most recent one died today. I will need to find another option because the one I used to buy isn't available anymore.
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Nunas
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#36: Post by Nunas »

BaristaBoy E61 wrote:Or, is the relay or contactor bar 'single throw' or 'double throw' :roll:
AFAIK, contactors are always single throw...at least, I've never seen one that is double throw. Most relays I've used are double throw, and usually multipole, giving the choice to use the NO or NC side, or both. It's easy to wire either a relay or a contactor to control an espresso machine.

Mike-R
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#37: Post by Mike-R »

pizzaman383 wrote:I used a 20 amp pool timer (no WiFi) for years and it is still my backup. The 20 amp z-wave controllers I have used go bad after a couple of years - my most recent one died today. I will need to find another option because the one I used to buy isn't available anymore.
If you want to try a wifi enabled pool timer next, Amazon has a pretty decent selection in the $40 to $60 price range.

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takeshi
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#38: Post by takeshi »

zfeldman wrote:I've been using this for a few years:

25amps, has a button, but also an app for scheduling.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09B9QRXWK
Thanks for posting this! We recently moved into a new house. Had a dedicated 20 amp circuit put into place for my Duetto but didn't consider how to handle scheduling and remote control like I had with the Wemo when it was running in 15 amp mode.

The only thing I would add is a recommendation to use wire ferrules on the stranded wire ends of the extension cord to ensure a good connection with the binding posts on the Sonoff POWR3. That's based on my understanding and I'm not an electrician so definitely do your own due diligence on this.

DaveC
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#39: Post by DaveC »

I have often wondered why the Italians don't make US coffee machines slightly differently for 115-120V.

I believe each of your sockets is wired to an individual circuit direct to the fuse box, no copper saving ring main for you guys (as we have). I always thought the machines could have a couple of C16 sockets in the back.

1 Socket is used if you want normal boiler priority mode and the software simple routed the power to the SSRs for both boilers.

Both sockets are used if you want to provide power to the brew boiler and pump with one and the steam boiler and associated circuitry with the other. of course this means having 2 outlets close together, so perhaps that's the problem.

Or the USA gradually moves to the more sensible 230/240V @ 60Hz. :lol:

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Jeff
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#40: Post by Jeff »

DaveC wrote:I believe each of your sockets is wired to an individual circuit direct to the fuse box, no copper saving ring main for you guys (as we have). I always thought the machines could have a couple of C16 sockets in the back.
Regrettably, no. In a typical duplex outlet, both sockets are fed off the same phase. There are often several duplex outlets in parallel on the same run to the fuse box or GFCI. Very seldom are there both phases available in the same 120-V outlet box, or even on the same wall.