Would monsoon malabar replace robusta?

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
MemPast
Posts: 33
Joined: April 9th, 2017

Postby MemPast » Jan 09, 2018, 12:09 am

Lately, I go to local coffee roaster who carry many single origins roasted to different degrees. I can ask for how dark the roast I want, and they are happy to fulfill my order. I buy single origins in small amounts and blend them for espresso. I am still new to buying fresh coffee and blending, so I am experimenting now with different coffees and different ratios.

I am a robusta lover, where I like classic italian blends, but it is hard to find a good fresh roasted robusta beans as single origin. I know that the malabar taste is robust and pungent, and it adds plenty of crema.

My question is: would monsoon malaber suffice in the place of robusta? I am not asking whether it is a replacement literally, rather I want to know whether I am missing on something by loosing the robusta or not.

BTW, I tried home roasting, but I am not good at it, so it is not an option to roast green robusta.

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Andy
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Postby Andy » Jan 11, 2018, 3:52 am

I don't think anyone can answer that for you. Robusta does bring pungency and crema, and MM may do the same to some degree. But whether you enjoy it as much, you just have to try it to find out.

Nunas
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Postby Nunas » Jan 11, 2018, 1:33 pm

Monsooned Malabar is a suitable bean for espresso blends. But it isn't a robusta substitute, as the robusta is added not just for its unique flavour, but also to boost the crema and caffeine level. Have you tried it as an SO? That would give you a better idea of the flavour that it will add to a blend. I sometimes roast it for blending and sometimes drink it as an SO. But, many people cannot get past the stink it makes in the initial stages of roasting. It's sometimes a hard bean to love :D .

MemPast
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Joined: April 9th, 2017

Postby MemPast » Jan 12, 2018, 11:27 pm

Thanks for the replies.

Actually I already use it in my experiment blends. It gives very rich crema, but sometimes the after taste is really heavy. I do like it,though.
Yet, I can not get what I used to when I get a "good" italian package (that happens only 30% :) Maybe more experimenting with different coffees would get me the taste I liked:)

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yakster
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Postby yakster » Jan 13, 2018, 12:42 am

Robusta beans age better than Arabica, and with some age the skunky/tire notes can mellow a bit.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

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mrak
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Postby mrak » Jan 15, 2018, 6:45 pm

Here is some info about Monsooned Malabar & Robusta beans and their use in espresso blends (taken from The Josuma Coffee site and Blog):

http://josumacoffee.tumblr.com/post/776 ... obustamyth

https://www.josuma.com/high-quality-robusta/

MemPast
Posts: 33
Joined: April 9th, 2017

Postby MemPast » Jan 16, 2018, 3:14 pm

Thanks for the info.

Robusta ages better than Arabic: well, it explains why I get better shots from a well packed italian blend when the robusta percentage is high compared to one with low percentage of robusta. I did not understand why I like more the cheaper blends offered by lavazza/segafredo/zicafe over the higher priced of the same brands. It looks like the robusta high percentage does the trick "for me" when it comes to packed coffee!

From the reading above, monsoon malabar means more crema, but robusta means persistent crema. That tells the difference. Thanks.