Wendelboe coffee has not been good to me the last five or so that I have had - Page 2

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
malling

#11: Post by malling »

And how are you brewing it?

Have you tried cupping it? By cupping it you can tell if it's the roast or you making a mistake somewhere as it will show the potential of any given coffee, if it taste blend it won't matter what you do with it.

Alternative you can do water cupping to find what water suits it.

Also rest, TW often needs 3-4 weeks of rest, like many other light roasters in Europe.

Also TCC is darker then Wendelboe in most cases, so yes generally perceived sweeter. Wendelboe has never been the roaster with the highest amount of perceived sweetness

He also recently changed to a Loring so it might have some effect, it took TCC considerably time to get a hand on it. The first many months I experienced roast that was off, it's been my experience so far with pretty much all roaster who switched to Loring.

erik82

#12: Post by erik82 »

I've got the 6 bags subscription (3 espresso and 3 filter) but last couple of months where all great. Lots of sweetness and clarity and very clean. Haven't really had a problem with the roasts for a pretty long time. Maybe sometimes an experimental bean that's not to my tasting but even then you can just taste quality.

In roast level they tend to roast just light enough but not overly underdeveloped like some roasters seem to do to comply to the as light as possible hype. The coffees are well developed and even after a month still taste very good.

Acavia (original poster)

#13: Post by Acavia (original poster) »

yakster wrote:Hmm, sounds like you already thought of that.
Today, I used 20% well water. Last time I had my well water checked it was 180ppm alkalinity and 200 ppm general hardness. I mixed 20% that well water and 80% distilled water measured into kettle, targeting 36 ppm Kh and 40 Gh, which per this post Oslo water should be close to Wendelboe water profile.

It was creamier but fairly same bitter edge. It had minute sweetness that was chalky. I think that is calcium as when I use calcium in crafted water, I get a similar taste with other coffees, and my well water hardness is almost all calcium.

Acavia (original poster)

#14: Post by Acavia (original poster) »

malling wrote:And how are you brewing it?

Have you tried cupping it? By cupping it you can tell if it's the roast or you making a mistake somewhere as it will show the potential of any given coffee, if it taste blend it won't matter what you do with it.

Alternative you can do water cupping to find what water suits it.

Also rest, TW often needs 3-4 weeks of rest, like many other light roasters in Europe.

Also TCC is darker then Wendelboe in most cases, so yes generally perceived sweeter. Wendelboe has never been the roaster with the highest amount of perceived sweetness

He also recently changed to a Loring so it might have some effect, it took TCC considerably time to get a hand on it. The first many months I experienced roast that was off, it's been my experience so far with pretty much all roaster who switched to Loring.
What is TCC? I get sweetness in other coffees, including Sey, to which I have a subscription and I get sweetness in every Sey coffee I have had so far. I think Sey is much lighter than Wendelboe.

Ejquin

#15: Post by Ejquin »

The Coffee Collective

malling

#16: Post by malling »

Acavia wrote:What is TCC? I get sweetness in other coffees, including Sey, to which I have a subscription and I get sweetness in every Sey coffee I have had so far. I think Sey is much lighter than Wendelboe.
The times I tried Sey they where about the same or just underdeveloped, but I might have been unlucky.

Wendelboe really depends on what you get and when you get it, it can both be light and medium light, you won't find a European roaster that just stick to a very light profile and that has been the case at least the past 5 years, they will all roast to what they think suits the bean. It's why I think the Nordic term is a misnomer.

You should also get perceived sweetness in wendelboe, you might just have been unlucky, but I never found his coffee to be the sweetest out there.

This is also why I read the taste description very carefully, it can sometimes tell what roast it is. But I still think you should cup it if you haven't already done so.

One of the more consistently light in Europe is Nero Scuro, if that is what your after.

Acavia (original poster)

#17: Post by Acavia (original poster) »

I took some vacuum sealed, frozen Wendelboe Geisha out of freeze the other day and have brewed it two days in a row. Not good coffee. I had not had any Wendelboe coffee for about a month, having about 5 other coffees, all good. The first sip of the Wendelboe was bad, as in really did not want to finish the cup - harsh, with a roast/burnt flavor. As it cooled, it got passable but not good coffee. All the other coffees, from various roasters, were good - most sweet and creamy and smooth easy to drink, brewed the same way. I wont buy anymore, and probably will throw some that I have away.

It is my taste I assume since it is so popular. It taste like Onyx coffee to me, which I also do not like as it all has a strong roast taste to me making all Onyx coffees taste the same pretty much.

Ejquin

#18: Post by Ejquin »

I generally dislike Onyx but generally really like Wendelboe. So..to each his own, I guess...

erik82

#19: Post by erik82 »

I've got the Geisha from TW here right now and it's superb. Really great and complex tasting coffee without defects. Could be you didn't freeze it right or left it in the freezer for too long. Of it's just that you don't really like lighter roasts of super clean coffees.

Acavia (original poster)

#20: Post by Acavia (original poster) »

Both in my yard now, so I dub Wendelboe coffee, yard coffee : )