Sweet, rich, big bodied, low acid coffees for espresso - Page 2

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
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drgary
Team HB

#11: Post by drgary »

Thank you, Luca, for your alert to not use scoring as the only factor for a selecting, excellent coffees. Also, thank you for distinguishing between preferred styles of coffee and the sensory qualities of the coffees themselves.

As a home roaster, I like to buy greens from suppliers who sell that same coffee, roasted. Klatch is one example. They are not going to roast and sell something that is substandard.

Another avenue is to use trusted greens suppliers who independently taste their coffees. Some of those use inflated points scoring that I count on less than their description of flavors. Others help me select coffees that I might not know when searching for flavor attributes, such as being strong in chocolates and sweetness. A factor I use in ordering greens is to get something that was recently harvested.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

Milligan
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#12: Post by Milligan »

I like medium Brazil coffees. Depends on the mood. No need to go dark to get the acidity down to what the average coffee drinker enjoys while keeping bitterness in check. A chocolatey, clean 17/18 Brazil roasted solid medium with a Brazil Yellow Catuai roasted a touch lighter gives a profile that retains a bit of sparkle with low bitterness.

It would be nice to hear more about classic coffees on here instead of the latest $30+ 250g coffee "drop".

I have a Chiapas Finca Nuevo Mexico Beyunka Semi-Washed on the way from Hacea that I'm excited about. Heavy body, reduced acidity, fudge brownie, big chocolate, recommended medium to medium light profile. So hopefully no need to go too dark to get those rich qualities.

Luca, curious to know what origins/varieties you prefer for the big body, low acid, rich and sweet profile without needing deeper roasts? Or if you've had any "chocolate bomb" coffees lately that were memorable?

Thanks for the thread. I tend to like a wide variety of coffees.

BodieZoffa

#13: Post by BodieZoffa »

another_jim wrote:I've been roasting and blending chocolate and dried fruit espresso blends for my morning cappa and for guests for over two decades (I prefer more fruit frward straight shots, although still with some roast). Here's what I know.

Classically, you want a blend with four components: a solid DP Harar or Sidamo, a solid DP Brazil, a really high quality PNG or Lintong and a really high quality Robusta The proportions are about 10 to 20% for the Robusta, 40% for the Brazil, and the other two depnding on how much bass and treble you like. The robusta is roasted into the second crack and staled, so roast it separate and include it with the others as needed. The other three coffees can be preblended, but if possible roast the Ethiopian separately (I typically roast a good one for straight shots, and throw some into the cappa blend)

For good body and chocolate and sweetness on the Indo and Brazil, I find a roast dropped just ahead of the first pops of the second works best. YMMV depending on your taste for distillates.

The problem is finding a good Indo and Brazil. Typically, finding good SO Ethiopians that can be used in the blend is easy. Daterra, especially Daterra Blue, is mostly a safe bet. Sigri and Kimmel estates are often good, but more a 2 in 3 shot. It's best to cup through a lot of of them and chuck anthing that doesn't wow you right away. If it's a really bad year for Brazils and Indos, my blends aren't much better than a good quality Italian blend.

Sometimes, you find an SO that does body, chcolate and dried fruit (typically something like a Harar or Matari, or a really heavy bodied Sidamo) George Howell's medium roast Worka Chelbessa, despite being wet processed, fits the bill. The problem is that this is an expensive way to get a something that should be an inexpensive commodity blend.
I seek out dry process Brazilian offerings often and absolutely by far the best I've found to roast for my taste/texture preference is the Pedra Branca Sweet Maria's offers periodically. I find most SOs to be boring, one-dimensional, but the DP Pedra Branca is killer on its own and my only regret is only getting 5 lbs of it the last order instead of 20 as it sold out rather quickly. I do have the honey process version of it arriving tomorrow, but that's a new to me green and surely/hopefully it will be rather good.

Cranked

#14: Post by Cranked »

I have to admit as the weather gets cooler I am thinking more about big heavy gloopy shots. I've used the Pedra Branca coffee and agree it's a good one. I've also used SWs Rwanda Kivu Kageyo. Adds a very nice candied orange peel flavor that is tasty in straight shots and milk drinks.

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another_jim
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#15: Post by another_jim »

BodieZoffa wrote: ... my taste/texture preference is the Pedra Branca Sweet Maria's offers periodically. ...
Thanks, appreciate the tip My usual go to has been Daterra's Sweel Blue, but I'm always eager to see if there's better.
Jim Schulman

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luca (original poster)
Team HB

#16: Post by luca (original poster) »

Milligan wrote:I like medium Brazil coffees. Depends on the mood. No need to go dark to get the acidity down to what the average coffee drinker enjoys while keeping bitterness in check. A chocolatey, clean 17/18 Brazil roasted solid medium with a Brazil Yellow Catuai roasted a touch lighter gives a profile that retains a bit of sparkle with low bitterness.

...

I have a Chiapas Finca Nuevo Mexico Beyunka Semi-Washed on the way from Hacea that I'm excited about. Heavy body, reduced acidity, fudge brownie, big chocolate, recommended medium to medium light profile. So hopefully no need to go too dark to get those rich qualities.

Luca, curious to know what origins/varieties you prefer for the big body, low acid, rich and sweet profile without needing deeper roasts? Or if you've had any "chocolate bomb" coffees lately that were memorable?

Thanks for the thread. I tend to like a wide variety of coffees.
Yeah, like I said, I don't seek out these coffees, so I'm not a good person to ask. Tim Wendelboe's selection of the Caballeros' catuai is always a bit of a highlight for me. It is always pretty chocolatey, but in recent years it has gotten a little bit of dried fruit added in, like a dried apricot.

I actually need some light roast brazil for a coffee workshop, so I've ordered some (roasted) from Monastery Coffee:

https://monastery.coffee/collections/cu ... ral-brazil

https://monastery.coffee/collections/cu ... ral-brazil
Milligan wrote:It would be nice to hear more about classic coffees on here instead of the latest $30+ 250g coffee "drop".
I don't know about "instead"; I'd prefer "as well as". In particular, the most valuable information is whatever makes it easy for people to work out if they would not like the more expensive coffees, so they can avoid wasting money on them.
another_jim wrote:Thanks, appreciate the tip My usual go to has been Daterra's Sweel Blue, but I'm always eager to see if there's better.
Agree. Exactly the sort of pointer I hoped people would give. I'm out of touch with these coffees, but Daterra are of course a classic, and huge, producer. They have a lot of offerings and their webpage gives some detail, and in English:

http://www.daterracoffee.com.br
LMWDP #034 | 2011: Q Exam, WBrC #3, Aus Cup Tasting #1 | Insta: @lucacoffeenotes

Milligan
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#17: Post by Milligan »

luca wrote: I don't know about "instead"; I'd prefer "as well as". In particular, the most valuable information is whatever makes it easy for people to work out if they would not like the more expensive coffees, so they can avoid wasting money on them.
Agreed. Poor word choice on my part.

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Sal

#18: Post by Sal »

Last week for the "Coffee Day" sale, Torque Roaster out of San Diego was running a fantastic sale of 75% off regular price. I learned of the sale from someone posting about it on HB. The price was so irresistible, that I had to try some. Ended up ordering 5 bags, which came to be even with shipping (only $4) totaling $25.25.

One of the bags named very appropriately "Cocoa Drop" is absolutely fantastic if a chocolaty, syrupy, sweet cup is what you want in a cup. According to their website, the current blend is made up of the following three beans:
  • 20% Finca Diamante - Guatemala
  • 40% Gaitania Community - Colombia
  • 40% Finca Diamante - Guatemala - DARK
I only brew it in AeroPress. However, they say it is a "blend designed to be served as espresso". Even in a filter brew, all notes listed "Milk Chocolate, Fuji Apple, cacao and maple syrup with a hint of boysenberry in the finish" are easily found in a cup. The regular price is $19/12oz (340g), but they seem to run frequent discount promotions if you are on their mailing list. If I don't roast my own coffee, I can see going back to them regularly.

I am a home-roaster, not a home-barista...

mgrayson
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#19: Post by mgrayson »

another_jim wrote:Thanks, appreciate the tip My usual go to has been Daterra's Sweel Blue, but I'm always eager to see if there's better.
I'm happily working through 5 lbs. of this, and it's very versatile!

HBchris

#20: Post by HBchris »

Sal wrote:Last week for the "Coffee Day" sale, Torque Roaster out of San Diego was running a fantastic sale of 75% off regular price. I learned of the sale from someone posting about it on HB. The price was so irresistible, that I had to try some. Ended up ordering 5 bags, which came to be even with shipping (only $4) totaling $25.25.

One of the bags named very appropriately "Cocoa Drop" is absolutely fantastic if a chocolaty, syrupy, sweet cup is what you want in a cup. According to their website, the current blend is made up of the following three beans:
  • 20% Finca Diamante - Guatemala
  • 40% Gaitania Community - Colombia
  • 40% Finca Diamante - Guatemala - DARK
I only brew it in AeroPress. However, they say it is a "blend designed to be served as espresso". Even in a filter brew, all notes listed "Milk Chocolate, Fuji Apple, cacao and maple syrup with a hint of boysenberry in the finish" are easily found in a cup. The regular price is $19/12oz (340g), but they seem to run frequent discount promotions if you are on their mailing list. If I don't roast my own coffee, I can see going back to them regularly.

image
I got several of their offerings during the sale, and so far have tried 2 of them as espresso. very impressed so far.

1)

Finca Sabana Redonda, Anaerobic SL28 Doble Diamond- Costa Rica, some sparkling acidity but nicely balanced with a prominent unuqie candied nut/walnut/coconut flavor that came through very pronounced and unqiue. (when paired with 6 oz capp it, the unique toasted nut cut through extremely well. One of the best capps had in while). Though it works really well in a milk drink imo, wouldn't characterize this as a big body or low acidity.

and
2)

I am just finishing up their "dark drop" as espresso and it is a standout.

Like straight cherry syrup. (18 in 34 out in 20 sec prebrew + 32 sec full brew).
Cant remember when I had cherry come through so sweetly and with a nice creamy body. YUM!



I have several more in the freezer from the sale... including that "cocoa drop" you referenced that I am looking forward to.