Some venting on freezing - Page 3

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
User avatar
cafeIKE
Supporter ★

#21: Post by cafeIKE »

SantoSerafino wrote:I have repeatedly had a mild but noticeable reaction to sucking in the air from a bag full of coffee like that. Yesterday it happened again so I think I'll be finding a different way to do it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypercapnia

roblumba (original poster)

#22: Post by roblumba (original poster) »

I like the reusability of the mason jars. Like I mentioned earlier, they are air tight because the do build up pressure while in the freezer and pop when I open them after defrosting.

But I do have one of those foodsaver contraptions and plenty of bag material to use, so I might give it a try and see if I notice a difference. I can tell you right now I'll probably hate cutting all those bags and sealing them. It's so easy to line up a bunch of mason jars and just pour the beans into each one, twist on the top, tape a label on them, and toss in the freezer.

I've improved my labeling process a bit for jars. Line up the jars in a single row across the counter. Pour and fill each one. Close them up. And then get your masking tape and tape across all the lids in one swipe. One strip of tape, across all the lids. I might line up 8 - 8 ounce jars like this, which will take 2-12 ounce bags of coffee. Then get a knife and just chop between each jar. Now write the bean / date info on the top and throw into the freezer.

SantoSerafino

#23: Post by SantoSerafino »

Thanks very much for that. My symptoms are more like those one gets when breathing dust, I end up feeling like I've been sanding wood with no mask. Anyway, it's an easy fix, I think the vacuum Ziplocs would do nicely.
See "Temperature Profiled Immersion Brewing By Smell" in 'Brewing'

User avatar
JohnB.
Supporter ♡

#24: Post by JohnB. »

roblumba wrote: But I do have one of those foodsaver contraptions and plenty of bag material to use, so I might give it a try and see if I notice a difference. I can tell you right now I'll probably hate cutting all those bags and sealing them. It's so easy to line up a bunch of mason jars and just pour the beans into each one, twist on the top, tape a label on them, and toss in the freezer.
I can't argue about the mason jars being easier, I didn't even bother with the tape. Just write on the lid with a sharpie. When you want to use the jar for something else wipe off the info with rubbing alcohol & relabel. I think for short term storage the jars are fine but for more then a couple weeks the vacuum bags are the way to go.
LMWDP 267

User avatar
sweaner
Supporter ♡

#25: Post by sweaner »

SantoSerafino wrote:Thanks very much for that. My symptoms are more like those one gets when breathing dust, I end up feeling like I've been sanding wood with no mask. Anyway, it's an easy fix, I think the vacuum Ziplocs would do nicely.

I like the Reynolds Handi-Vac better than the Ziplock brand. Consumer Reports did find that these bags worked very well for frozen foods.
Scott
LMWDP #248

Enki

#26: Post by Enki »

Has anybody tried anything with inert gas displacing the container? I was thinking about using argon or CO2 to push all of the regular air out of the package. Medical gas suppliers (and welding supplies) generally have this stuff pretty cheap. I actually have the welding gas already, but was curious about results...

caeffe

#27: Post by caeffe »

sweaner wrote:I like the Reynolds Handi-Vac better than the Ziplock brand. Consumer Reports did find that these bags worked very well for frozen foods.
I just recently bought a 5 lb bag of Black Cat from Intelligentsia. I find I use about 1 lb in about 1 1/2 weeks.
I put some in a small canning glass jar (about 200g) and some in one of those containers that have a gasket with a big metal clip that closes it (obviously a picture would help here) and some in a gallon Reynolds Handi-Vac. I went ahead and froze the ones in the jar and kept the Handi-Vac bag in the cupboard to see if it would lose vacuum

Unfortunately after a couple of days (I bagged on Sunday, checked it Tuesday) - the vacuum was gone, indicated by a loose bag.
I did this experiment as I received some coffee greens in one of those sealed vacuum Food-Saver bags and found that after some time, probably days/weeks (I didn't keep exact track of time) the vacuum was gone.

So, maybe it was pilot error but for now I'll stick with the jars.
I'll probably eventually buy more of the canning glass jars as I only have one left and it is only a small one that is enough for ~200g.
LMWDP #162

portamento

#28: Post by portamento »

caeffe,

Sounds like the reason the vacuum was lost was because your fresh Black Cat was degassing. But I guess there's no way to really know whether any air was introduced from the outside. If you froze the bag, degassing would be slowed and the vacuum would probably be maintained.

Still, I prefer mason jars in the freezer, figuring that glass is less porous than plastic and a mason lid is more airtight than a disposable one-way valve.

Also -- doesn't anyone else hate the plastic baggy odor/taste that fresh bags impart to their contents? I can hardly stand to leave a ham sandwich in a baggy, let alone coffee. I would prefer to see a vacuum storage solution based on sturdy, odorless mylar bags.

-Ryan
Ryan

User avatar
sweaner
Supporter ♡

#29: Post by sweaner »

I do agree about the smell from the plastic bags. I would never be able to commandeer freezer space for mason jars. The bags can be made very flat and take up little room.
Scott
LMWDP #248

User avatar
JohnB.
Supporter ♡

#30: Post by JohnB. »

You may get an odor from a baggy but the Foodsaver bag material is odor free. If you are vacuum bagging beans with some broken pieces you can end up with a minor puncture which will cause an eventual loss of vacuum. Other then this my bagged beans retain their vacuum for 6-8 weeks which is the longest I keep them. How do the Reynolds Vacuum bags seal? Standard ziplock style gasket?
LMWDP 267