Poor person's freshest coffee choice - Page 5

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
espressoren
Posts: 447
Joined: 1 year ago

#41: Post by espressoren »

jpender wrote:I was joking.

Is it really the nitrogen packaging or just the nature of Italian coffee that lends to a long, stable lifetime? I left some Saka in the cupboard for about 6 months just to see how it would hold up. It had declined a little and didn't have as much crema. But it wasn't bad. Pretty much like the many-months-old Lavazza I've bought from Amazon. You could do worse with freshly roasted coffee. I regularly toss out freshly roasted beans that I just don't like.
I've got to learn to read the room, I guess!

You have me thinking though, maybe the cheapest option is to find a friend who is throwing out fresh beans they don't like :) Or possibly going in with someone on an order to save shipping, or a group buy.

jpender
Posts: 3784
Joined: 11 years ago

#42: Post by jpender »

espressoren wrote:You have me thinking though, maybe the cheapest option is to find a friend who is throwing out fresh beans they don't like :) Or possibly going in with someone on an order to save shipping, or a group buy.
I'd happily give away beans instead of composting them. Shipping them doesn't make sense though.

Before Cantina people here on HB were doing group buys of Saka. As far as I know you can still buy from them directly. The deal was that you had to contact them and there was a minimum order of 6kg. I'm not sure how much you'd save though.

I suppose you could buy cheap greens and then roast in a pan or in your oven. That would mean zero start up cost. It would still take time and kind of stink up the kitchen though. And although I've read of people being happy with oven roasted coffee it would probably be best to keep one's expectations low.

Rustic39
Posts: 184
Joined: 4 years ago

#43: Post by Rustic39 »

I'll jump in on the side of home roasting, but with a few caveats for the concern of saving money. I use a "Hive" stovetop roaster. It ran about $75. It's a specialty pan made for roasting coffee, with a twist of using convection to aid in achieving an even roast. The biggest challenge would be managing the smoke. If you don't have a commercial style exhaust hood, then setting up a way to roast outside is the best option. A propane burner would do this nicely.

Another pro consideration in roasting your own is the fact, that you would be able to do the following:
1. Sample the world's best offerings for a fraction of the price on average, vs paying retail roaster's costs.
2. You are able to control the availability and freshness of your roasted coffee supply much more efficiently.
3. You are able to broaden the variety of coffees you try more efficiently. Even when you stick with a single source/single origin bean, you can make significant changes in flavor profiles by changing your roast levels.
4. You really can save big $ doing it yourself. I get most of my greens from Sweet Marias.

I started home roasting because of the poor off-the-shelf products in my local, and the headaches of trying to always have an online order submitted in sync with when I might run out. It's a constant learning experience for me, roasting this way and forever dialing in a new roast. But I've enjoyed some of the best the world has to offer, for a fraction of the normal cost, and some of my time.
To the guy who tried the geisha greens, I too have roasted those and am not a big fan, but let me suggest one of my favorite blends. About 60% geisha and 40 % Sumatran both roasted to Full City+, stopping just as second cracks commences. About 205 degrees wtr temp, and a yield ratio of 1:3. Very nice all around lungo shot.

Brewbom
Posts: 10
Joined: 5 months ago

#44: Post by Brewbom »

In my opinion one of the top quality, most amazingly priced coffee brands out there is Equal Exchange (disclaimer Nanelle my wife used to work there) Consistently at almost any place that carries them they sell bulk beans for $9.99 to $12.99 a lb. And they pay their farmers extraordinarily well, they are a worker owned cooperative and they are an amazing company I every way.

Their Breakfast Blend is a study in just damn good coffee. We are coffee geeks and roasters and that coffee never isn't totally delicious cup after cup. And it's almost always pretty fresh. Equal Exchange is all over San Diego (thanks Nanelle!) and nationwide. They don't get the respect they deserve. 100% organic and fairly traded (they invented the whole concept) and they use a Colortrack to keep their roasts tight and consistent.

bznelson91
Supporter ♡
Posts: 160
Joined: 3 months ago

#45: Post by bznelson91 »

espressoren wrote:You have me thinking though, maybe the cheapest option is to find a friend who is throwing out fresh beans they don't like :) Or possibly going in with someone on an order to save shipping, or a group buy.
Honestly, this. I'm fortunate to have the resources to support my coffee habit, but I have a friend who's not so well situated. She looks after our cats when we travel, and this is part of our "barter" agreement for that. I pass along bags of coffee that are still fresh but just aren't my thing tastewise, and she gets to enjoy good coffee while my wife and I get to travel with confidence knowing our kitties are taken care of.

Basically, something in this realm, perhaps some other barter situation with a local friend or group.

Another idea that I'll confess I've not tried, but I know it's a thing: Try to befriend a local roaster and see if they might be willing to pass along some beans that maybe they did a test roast on, but didn't like the results. A big bag of such beans could be portioned and frozen and would last a long time.

Brad