Poor person's freshest coffee choice - Page 4

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
Splatcat
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#31: Post by Splatcat »

Don't give up coffee. If you find yourself in a pinch, send me a message and I'll send you some coffee. Hang on to life's small pleasures and joy's. Don't let them beat you down.

David R.
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#32: Post by David R. »

KarlInSanDiego wrote: Old-bean espresso isn't very tasty anyway.
Assuming this is for espresso drinks, you might find that beans from Italian roasters, while not the freshest, are less stale than beans from your local supermarket, simply because they package better. Lavazza, for example, vacuum packs, and you can usually find some of their Arabica espresso blends for under $15/kilo at Amazon. That's right in your price range, and it is perfectly adequate for milk drinks.

I wanted to give you some names of a couple of decent budget mail-order roasters I've used, but one retired (selling his 'practice' to someone who is no longer so cheap), one no longer sells to non-businesses, and the others jacked prices above your level during Covid.
David R.

ShotClock
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#33: Post by ShotClock »

I really enjoy roasting, but it takes a significant investment of time and money to get up and running. I wouldn't recommend it as a cost saving measure, although maybe its just my approach that's the problem.

If you haven't tried it yet, Saka (classic Italian espresso) is $11.30 per pound from Cantina coffee. Miles better than Lavazza etc, extremely fresh for Italian coffee and makes spectacular milk drinks. I normally buy a couple of kg and have it in the freezer in 250g bags.

Milligan
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#34: Post by Milligan »

It is hard to beat the $12 1kg Lavazza deals that pop up on Amazon from time to time. If one could afford to lay out a bit of money to stock up and freeze the bags then you'd definitely have something better than buying from the clear dispensers at a grocery store (open to air and extremely stale.)

jpender
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#35: Post by jpender »

ShotClock wrote:If you haven't tried it yet, Saka (classic Italian espresso) is $11.30 per pound from Cantina coffee. Miles better than Lavazza etc, extremely fresh for Italian coffee and makes spectacular milk drinks. I normally buy a couple of kg and have it in the freezer in 250g bags.
You're neglecting the cost of shipping. That pushes the price up to a little over $14 per pound and that's only if you buy two kilos. Still a good deal but it's 75% more than what the OP is paying now.

jpender
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#36: Post by jpender »

I wonder why nobody has suggested buying some Lavazza on Amazon? While not fresh that seems like a good way to get some decent coffee on the cheap.

espressoren
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#37: Post by espressoren »

It has been mentioned a few times. I agree that a sealed nitrogen purged bag of coffee is probably going to be better and stay fresher than bulk bin coffee (and probably actually produce crema) and most importantly can be found at the same price with some effort. Buy it on sale and freeze it.

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GregoryJ
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#38: Post by GregoryJ »

I would personally do pourovers / drip coffee. It would be much more economical for me, because I can easily drink three 14g shots of espresso in the morning, but with drip coffee I would only use 15-30g for 250-500 mL.
Also, you have to use milk to cover up the taste of your grocery store espresso. Maybe cutting out the milk and using less coffee could let you purchase some $12/lb mail order coffee.

espressoren
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#39: Post by espressoren »

You can buy from Lavazza direct for $6.81/lb as of today (Rossa@$15/2.2lb). Some of their other beans are in the $7.60/lb range.

You'd need to spend $50 to get free shipping though.

jpender
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#40: Post by jpender »

espressoren wrote:It has been mentioned a few times. I agree that a sealed nitrogen purged bag of coffee is probably going to be better and stay fresher than bulk bin coffee (and probably actually produce crema) and most importantly can be found at the same price with some effort. Buy it on sale and freeze it.
I was joking.

Is it really the nitrogen packaging or just the nature of Italian coffee that lends to a long, stable lifetime? I left some Saka in the cupboard for about 6 months just to see how it would hold up. It had declined a little and didn't have as much crema. But it wasn't bad. Pretty much like the many-months-old Lavazza I've bought from Amazon. You could do worse with freshly roasted coffee. I regularly toss out freshly roasted beans that I just don't like.