Leaving coffee beans in hopper - Page 3

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
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woodchuck

#21: Post by woodchuck »

FWIW I run about three to four days worth of coffee in the hopper (about 1/2 a pound). The next batch comes out of the freezer , thaws out and gets poured on top of the previous batch. I change coffees about once a week. That's the time I give the grinder a really good cleaning and start again. I have a Macap M4 and find the grind pretty consistent with minor tweaks for coffee aging and humidity changes ... Cheers Ian

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JonR10

#22: Post by JonR10 »

CoffeeOwl wrote:The grind setting should be adjusted with running empty grinder. Now, weather conditions change from morning to evening even though it's winter and sometimes I have open window or a humiditor on etc. Then the conclusion is: the units are all inadequate for home use (anyway this is what is in the manuals written with big bold red letters).
Interesting point.

I believe that the reasons I first started to run single shots (empty hopper) were to minimize waste and to be able to make adjustments with the grinder running empty, and thus enable me to make truly precise adjustments on consecutive shots without grinding up a bunch of wasted coffee. In this way I can measure my dose into the throat of the grinder and when I clear it through I have my desired dose in the basket with only wisps of waste left behind in the grinder (fractions of a gram, at worst)

It seems to me that if I choose to run my hopper with (for example) 1/2 pound of beans in it all the time then I would need to measure my doses coming out of the doser. To me this would seem to involve much more waste because there's no way to precisely grind just the amount I want so I'll always end up with excess in the doser at the end of my session. Maybe with a precise timer I could guesstimate the grind quantity closer?

As I narrowed down the short list for this last grinder upgrade, I considered the Anfim Super Caimano with the hitech timer upgrade. I presume that the timer was developed for this very purpose (in my limited understanding it's precisely tweakable)

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jesawdy

#23: Post by jesawdy »

JonR10 wrote:It seems to me that if I choose to run my hopper with (for example) 1/2 pound of beans in it all the time then I would need to measure my doses coming out of the doser. To me this would seem to involve much more waste because there's no way to precisely grind just the amount I want so I'll always end up with excess in the doser at the end of my session. Maybe with a precise timer I could guesstimate the grind quantity closer?
Jon-

My advice would be to give a try for a week or so and see what you think. You may love it or you may hate it.

I started out on the Rocky, and dosed the hopper and ground until empty. I gave it up fairly quickly as it was an extra step, and I also found that I could eyeball the dose pretty well from the doserless Rocky. I use ridgeless baskets and a 0.1 gram scale to confirm as needed. My waste ground coffee went into a small square Pyrex dish under the exit chute. Typically, in two weeks time, I'd have a little more than a doubles worth of waste in that dish.... just in time for a seasoning shot after a chemical backflush, no waste (you may like to chemical backflush more or less frequently, I prefer to water backflush every session, to each his own).

On my Cimbali grinders, same thing, only now my waste goes to the grinds tray. Give yourself some time to see what sort of waste accumulates over a week or two's time... I think you will find that it doesn't amount to much most of the time.

As for an accurate timer.... I just count in my head, brush the retained grinds from the chute and empty the doser into the portafilter, typically gets close enough for me. Little to no waste, grinder ready to go for the next shot or next session. Again, use a scale to confirm or "recalibrate" periodically. Grind/dose a bit more or level with a bent finger to adjust. Voila! (underdosing or "proper" dosing may give some headaches in adjusting the dose with your finger)
Jeff Sawdy

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JonR10

#24: Post by JonR10 »

jesawdy wrote:On my Cimbali grinders, same thing, only now my waste goes to the grinds tray. Give yourself some time to see what sort of waste accumulates over a week or two's time... I think you will find that it doesn't amount to much most of the time.
As always I appreciate good advice.

So how do you handle dialing in a new blend? ( for example, today I was given a pound of Klatch WBC Blend). I assume it must be done with plenty of beans in the hopper, and then if a shot runs too fast or slow you'd have to grind through as you adjust the grind and then you'd have to clear all that ground coffee for the next trial shot. If it takes 2-3 shots to get close, it seems to me it seems that would add up to alot of waste....

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HB
Admin

#25: Post by HB »

JonR10 wrote:...if a shot runs too fast or slow you'd have to grind through as you adjust the grind and then you'd have to clear all that ground coffee for the next trial shot.
Are you typically that far off? Most coffees I use are within a couple notches of each other. I know manufacturers and vendors say "Thou shall not move thy grinder setting" unless the motor is running, but if I'm moving the setting a couple millimeters, I don't worry about the burrs binding.
Dan Kehn

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JonR10

#26: Post by JonR10 »

HB wrote:Are you typically that far off?
When I run my own or similarly-roasted blends I'm usually VERY close....but when I run much lighter roasts or darker oily roasts then it usually takes me at least 2-3 shots to get dialed in. As an extreme case, when I ran the Paradise espresso it took me several shots to get acceptable timing.

This is my concern today with the Klatch roast in my hands, it's lighter than my norm


EDIT - Please remember also that I just got a new grinder and I don't have a great feel for how difference much a 1-turn adjustment really makes. I tried a few shots today with some bean column and the results were interesting....but i also burned through quite alot of beans (this conical grinds FAST!)


Today, with just a couple shots' worth in the throat there was no discernable difference. With twice that amount my "normale" setting poured more like a "ristretto". No measurements and nothing scientific yet, but I can see that there will be a difference keeping beans in the hopper.


EDIT 2 - so far I'm not thrilled with the ++waste. Shot consistency is not an issue for me loading per shot...but it was be an issue today with beans in the hopper because the shot timing changes as the bean column reduces (unless of course I keep a few days' worth at all time and continually top off).

Ken Fox

#27: Post by Ken Fox »

HB wrote:I know manufacturers and vendors say "Thou shall not move thy grinder setting" unless the motor is running, but if I'm moving the setting a couple millimeters, I don't worry about the burrs binding.
I've decided that there is no way a grinder can be damaged by adjusting the grind to become coarser when the burrs are not moving. I can't come up with a way that a grinder would be damaged under that scenario. So, I don't hesitate to adjust coarser with the grinder at idle. I do not do any significant adjustments to a finer setting unless the burrs are moving, but in all honesty I think these commercial grinders are robust enough that this wouldn't matter, either.

ken
What, me worry?

Alfred E. Neuman, 1955

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cannonfodder
Team HB

#28: Post by cannonfodder »

JonR10 wrote:
EDIT 2 - so far I'm not thrilled with the ++waste. Shot consistency is not an issue for me loading per shot...but it was be an issue today with beans in the hopper because the shot timing changes as the bean column reduces (unless of course I keep a few days' worth at all time and continually top off).
That is what I do.

One of the interesting things about the conical grinders are the small bean to bean adjustments and the day to day changes, or lack there of. I recently ran 3 different blends/SO's in a Robur all in the time span of a few hours (around 9 pounds of coffee). The Robur took a very small adjustment between blends, one shot and I was good to go. I later packed up the grinder, drove 6 hours back home and set it up on my espresso bar.

The next day I dumped in one of my home blends, one shot, one adjustment and I was off and running. A half pound later I had made no adjustments to the grind until I reached the last two shots worth of beans. Knowing that the grind shifts and the shots start to flow quicker, I automatically tighten the grind a couple (or three) notches to compensate. While the shots were not as spot on as the rest of the coffee, it was still very drinkable. I usually use the last shots worth of beans in the grinder to do a seasoning shot after a backflush.

Conicals are a different beast and have they own idiosyncrasies and those vary from brand to brand just like espresso machines. Once you get a little more time on the MK7R you will be able to anticipate the shift and needed adjustments. The waste will go down eventually.

That Klatch WBC blend is something else, the USBC blend is very good as well. I actually preferred the US blend. I should order another pound before it is gone for good.

Almost forgot, when I am adjusting the grind it is usually one or two notches on the Mazzers or one or two clicks on the Cimbali Max. I do not run the grinder during that small change. I do sweep out the grind chute and give the grinder a quick one or two second pulse to clear out the grinds in the burr chamber. On a big burr buzz saw of a bean crusher like the MK7R and Robur that is half a shot of beans. That is the price we pay for the quest for the ultimate espresso. I believe there is a little more waste with most of the conicals, just a passing observation with the Titan grinders and my own bean crusher of death.
Dave Stephens

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JonR10

#29: Post by JonR10 »

cannonfodder wrote: Conicals are a different beast and have they own idiosyncrasies and those vary from brand to brand just like espresso machines. Once you get a little more time on the MK7R you will be able to anticipate the shift and needed adjustments. The waste will go down eventually.

That Klatch WBC blend is something else, the USBC blend is very good as well. I actually preferred the US blend. I should order another pound before it is gone for good.

Sucks to be the profit of my own failures, but the worst case is evident to me this morning.

The Klatch coffee is dramatically different in pour characteristic than my own and I made the mistake of trying to run it on the big conical loaded up instead of using my faithful Super-Jolly. Now because I was trying to run with beans in the hopper the end result was WAY too much wasted coffee.

Perhaps it's just my incompetency in technique :roll: but I can honestly say if I was grinding per shot then I would have only burned 2-3 shots worth to dial in. I didn't weigh the waste but it's easily 6-7 doubles. The stepless worm drive takes a few turns to move the collar even one notch.


So for me it's absolutely NOT worthwhile to load up a hopper full of beans and then attempt to dial in a blend. So if I'm going to be switching beans (even occasionally) then I'd refrain from such wasteful practice.

cannonfodder wrote:Almost forgot, when I am adjusting the grind it is usually one or two notches on the Mazzers or one or two clicks on the Cimbali Max. I do not run the grinder during that small change.

My Macap has a stepless worm drive, so I guess I'm a little afraid to use that mechanism to FORCE the burrs closer together while they are filled up with grounds being compacted by a bean column above. Forgive me for being a chicken, but the last thing I want to risk is damaging my new investment.

I'm giving this notion up, at least until I go back to running my own blend week-to-week.
Ken Fox wrote:I've decided that there is no way a grinder can be damaged by adjusting the grind to become coarser when the burrs are not moving. I can't come up with a way that a grinder would be damaged under that scenario.
Agreed - I would only be concerned about adjusting finer.

Ken Fox

#30: Post by Ken Fox »

JonR10 wrote:Perhaps it's just my incompetency in technique but I can honestly say if I was grinding per shot then I would have only burned 2-3 shots worth to dial in. I didn't weigh the waste but it's easily 6-7 doubles. The stepless worm drive takes a few turns to move the collar even one notch.


So for me it's absolutely NOT worthwhile to load up a hopper full of beans and then attempt to dial in a blend. So if I'm going to be switching beans (even occasionally) then I'd refrain from such wasteful practice.
I don't think there is any difference in waste between the "techniques" if one is dialing in a new coffee. I do this all the time with my Max's, which should be less forgiving than your new conical. It is very rare for me to waste more than one shot's worth in dialing in a new coffee, running the hopper with a couple day's worth of beans in it as my normal practice. One other thing I do (when feasible) is to plan the bean change for first thing in the morning, so that the first shot would go into my once-daily cappa. I will use an espresso shot that is at the margin of acceptability in a cappa, that I might pitch were it in a straight shot. This further cuts down on the potential waste, regardless of grinder loading "technique" used.

I believe that your problem is, as you suggest, unfamiliarity with your new grinder. I would suggest that it is probably best to experiment with new grinding "techniques" when one is using a familiar and inexpensive coffee such as a garden variety homeroast. The same can be said for any significant changes in approach in any part of espresso production. I recently changed my roasting technique and ended up incinerating about 6lbs of very nice green, quite stupid in retrospect. When I went to do a trial roasting session 3 days ago, to "get back on track," I used some coffees that were not particularly special to me, so that if I had to pitch them, it would be no great loss.

I just want to make the point, that there is nothing inherently more wasteful about loading up a hopper vs. dosing into it for each shot, and I continue to think that the grind quality suffers when using the latter technique, in comparison to the former.

ken
What, me worry?

Alfred E. Neuman, 1955