Italian cappuccino - Hausbrandt not coming through milk

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
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sparker69

#1: Post by sparker69 »

About half way through a bag of Hausbrandt Acadamia - my first purchase of the brand, my usual beans being traditional Italian blends - Kimbo, Caffè Borbone, Fantini. Have a bag of Danesi waiting in the freezer. I had read on a few of the postings on here that it was a lighter blend. Pulling ristretto shots with it, it's been really nice - 14g in, 14-24g out. But making Saturday morning cappuccinos, it seems to disappear in the milk. I'm usually pulling the 24g shots for cappuccinos. I tried a tighter shot and it came out a little more. Beyond trying another coffee :lol: do any of you have any experience with it for cappuccinos and do you have any suggestions?
"Every weirdo in the world is on my wavelength." - Thomas Pynchon

pizzaman383
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#2: Post by pizzaman383 »

You could try reducing the amount of milk.
Curtis
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“Taste every shot before adding milk!”

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sparker69 (original poster)

#3: Post by sparker69 (original poster) »

Yeah, I did that. It does bring the coffee through more, for sure. I guess, I was wondering what people thought on the effect of shot pull length in milk based drinks and how much it can bring the coffee to the forefront, if it can at all. I know that in my espresso shots, it changes mouthfeel and the flavour profile, but I was wondering what people thought about it in the drinks with milk. Do you tend to pull ristretto shots, standard or lungo when you're making an cappuccino?
"Every weirdo in the world is on my wavelength." - Thomas Pynchon

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slybarman

#4: Post by slybarman »

You could try a larger dose and longer shot. 18g in and 30 out. Not a traditional Italian dose, but clearly 14g isn't working for your in this instance.

mathof

#5: Post by mathof »

It may be the coffee. I used to live near a coffee bar in Venice that used Hausbrandt beans. While the espresso pleased me, I did note that the cappuccinos were less flavourful than was the norm in other bars.

coffeechan

#6: Post by coffeechan »

What size is the cup for the cappuccino and is it split like the Italians do it? 1 shot for 5-6oz cup or 2 shots in 5-6oz cup? Last time I had Hausbrandt it did pretty well in 8oz small lattes @14g in 25-28g out. You could try using 2% milk or a combination of whole/2%/1% milk to get your desired milk profile. The fat content of the milk could be what blunts the flavors you're looking for.

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sparker69 (original poster)

#7: Post by sparker69 (original poster) »

I was curious about the Hausbrandt because I wanted to try some other Italian brands and had just begun to hear about the coffee tradition in Trieste and that it is the "Mecca" of Italian coffee, (I had always assumed it was Napoli). Now I realize it's two different traditions. I had also heard that the Hausbrandt was a lighter roast. For the espressos, it is quite unique and I think I could pick it out blind tasting. It has a sort of peppery (as in the vegetable) taste - a bit of chili pepper, if that makes sense. I usually pull double ristrettos - 14g in, 24g out, or I sometimes try shorter shots - 14g in, 13g out. I've noticed as well that if I compare it to some of the other coffees I've been pulling - in particular Kimbo, there is a lot less crema. I regularly buy Borbone Blu as well. I have a kilo of Danesi Oro, down in freezer, waiting to give it a go after this bag. And I came across another bag of Hausbrandt - the Rosso that I want to try - just to get a fuller picture, (the one I have now the the Acadamia).
"Every weirdo in the world is on my wavelength." - Thomas Pynchon

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sparker69 (original poster)

#8: Post by sparker69 (original poster) »


Funny - I wasn't even sure what size my cups were! :oops: I use traditional Italian cappuccino cups - the dark brown ones - I just measured it - 6oz. I pull from a double basket and do the double shot for the cappuccino - usually 24g out although I tried a tighter shot to see if it made a difference - was wondering if a more concentrated shot would shine through more. In the end, it didn't. I use 2% milk for my cappuccinos.
I did try reducing my milk - maybe a centimetre below the lip of the cup and that made a difference. Came out much stronger. I guess I was just thinking, I can't imagine the Hausbrandt cafe in Trieste doing smaller cappuccinos to bring their coffee out in the mix.
"Every weirdo in the world is on my wavelength." - Thomas Pynchon

coffeechan

#9: Post by coffeechan »

It's likely because your blend is 100% arabica and part of their specialty line according to the espresso internationale website. I'd tone it down to a cortado or flat white then for the balance. I forgot to say my Hausbrandt was their Nonni or base 80/20 Arabica to Robusta. The Robusta will produce a different crema and body to the espresso for the traditional cappa. The Rosso I believe is something like a 60/40 Arabica to Robusta and might be the ticket for what you want. There is that bite/edge to Robusta that goes well to offset the sweetness of milk. Danesi Oro I hear is pretty good, but also 100% arabica and might be thinner.

If you want super fresh direct from Italy roasts, look into the Saka Caffe group buys that occur periodically. Saka Caffè in the States

There's a good thread about Italian coffee blends here. The hunt for best Italian roasted coffee beans

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sparker69 (original poster)

#10: Post by sparker69 (original poster) »

Ooh - I didn't know the Danesi was 100% Arabica. I do like some robusta in the mix. I'll have to see what the Rosso gives me. I think it was the same thing with the Borbone Oro - I think it's a 100% Arabica - couldn't get any decent crema out of it. That's why I usually tend to prefer the middle range blends that mix it in.
"Every weirdo in the world is on my wavelength." - Thomas Pynchon