I'm done with 'shipped' coffee - Page 4

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
Capuchin Monk
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#31: Post by Capuchin Monk »

maxwell wrote:I'd recommend trying Josuma Coffee. They roast once a week and ship the same day. Every batch of Malabar Gold that I've had has been excellent and arrived the next day.
Good roaster is good while they are good. But they do change over time. As the saying goes, only thing constant is the change itself; once you are at the top, the only way left is down; what goes up, must come down.

guyy
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#32: Post by guyy »

Milligan wrote:As with any hobby, you can start relatively inexpensively and then end up $10-20k in if the itch hits. I've had drinkable coffee from a skillet but you'll never get to $30 a 250g bag doing it that way. I'm sure the same can be said for craft beer. With more control and quality comes a substantial increase in funds. Where your taste is satisfied will be the ultimate decision maker both in coffee roasting and coffee buying.

IMO if you want to drink higher end specialty level coffees by roasting at home then get an Aillio Bullet and roast great coffee in a nice batch size on it for 10+ years and you'll likely be ahead (not including your time of course.). If you just care for grocery store quality coffee then a Behmor will do.
I have never had better coffee than the ones from a batch of Yirgacheffe i roasted in a skillet almost 20 years ago. Never. I certainly haven't enjoyed today's expensive coffees as much. (It's about time for a fourth wave, in my opinion)

The thing is, i never got back to that level of quality myself, not in a skillet, and not with other methods. I'd say that with cruder methods, the problem is more that it's harder to replicate results.

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Sal
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#33: Post by Sal replying to guyy »

+1 for this. I too have not found any, I mean ANY, expensive coffee roasted from world-famous roasters to be more enjoyable than the ones I roast myself in FreshRoast or Behmor. I can see why those specialty coffees from exclusive roasters cost so much... But, this is where more expensive coffee or even more quality controlled coffee does not always equate to a more enjoyable cup of coffee. I find most of the local roasters around me have more enjoyable coffees for me at a lower price point ~$18/lb than exclusive roasters far away charging $20+ for 10oz bags +shipping. Certainly, the number of samples I have tried so far is relatively small, say less than 50 so far, but I just have not found any of those expensive coffees to be "better" than $11/lb (final cost to me) home roasted coffee. But that is just for my taste preference, of course.
I am a home-roaster, not a home-barista...

Milligan
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#34: Post by Milligan »

guyy wrote:I have never had better coffee than the ones from a batch of Yirgacheffe i roasted in a skillet almost 20 years ago. Never. I certainly haven't enjoyed today's expensive coffees as much. (It's about time for a fourth wave, in my opinion)

The thing is, i never got back to that level of quality myself, not in a skillet, and not with other methods. I'd say that with cruder methods, the problem is more that it's harder to replicate results.
I'm sure those amazing greens would have tasted even better if roasted in a modern machine, and repeatable!

guyy
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#35: Post by guyy »

Possibly. I had had a lot of experience with skillet roasting and just wanted to try it again that day. In any case, there's no way of knowing for sure.

Mat-O-Matic
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#36: Post by Mat-O-Matic »

I rotate through a good handful of roasters and never have trouble with freshness. Most that I order from ship on the roast date or immediately after.

Of course, buying from a local shop--I'd say even if cost or quality takes a modest hit--has its own merits.

It's easy and inexpensive to roast coffee as good or better than most shops. A $20 popcorn popper can do it. A Behmor can do better and with larger batches. Certainly better than grocery stores.
LMWDP #716: Spring comes, and the grass grows by itself.

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luca
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#37: Post by luca »

I post this as someone who roasts a lot of what I drink. I'd just suggest that before anyone spends a bunch on a home roaster based on reading people write that they are getting better results than roasteries, they reach out to some local home roasters that claim their results are good and see if they can get to try some. Offer to pay for them. Make a friend. And taste for yourself. Before spending a lot of money.

Coffee roasteries of course have some "marketing puffery" about how great they are, and I don't think that home roasters are any different. I'm sure that all of them that talk about their roasts being better than commercial roasts believe it. But, equally, I've read home roasters raving about how they were roasting green coffee that's cheaper than standard spot prices that commercial roasters pay and they said it tasted great ... and the green was literally mouldy.

So ... I'm just suggesting ... try before you commit a lot of money, and see for yourself.
LMWDP #034 | 2011: Q Exam, WBrC #3, Aus Cup Tasting #1 | Insta: @lucacoffeenotes

Mbb
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#38: Post by Mbb »

For me its about convenience.......too few places to buy fresh coffee near me.....all out of way. Way out of way.

$20/lb vs $8 or so as well. You dont have to be as good as best roasters......only have to be better than other nearby options.

I see it as a chore......although comparing coffees is interesting. Good , bad,, i drink every lb thats drinkable. I have had very few i couldnt tolerate...but there was a couple.