The hunt for best Italian roasted coffee beans - Page 29

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
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GC7
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#281: Post by GC7 »

15 gm dose extracted with a lever profile at 198* for a yield of 24 gm. Standard basket.

5 oz flat whites were pure hazelnut with milk chocolate background. Delicious and given the seal of approval from the boss. She did opine that her flat white from my roast (Brazil-Sumatra-Colombia) was more complex and "rich tasting".

The coffee was a aliquot of my 1 KG bag from a year ago last July stored in the deep freeze.

I will buy another bag for sure. This is the opposite of my experience with Saka Gran Bar. I have 5 aliquots of that in the deep freeze and might address it again using different extraction conditions.

coffeechan

#282: Post by coffeechan »

jpender wrote:Maybe. But there were multiple people who said it was like a pure shot of Nutella. That actually would be gross to me as I think Nutella is a junk product. But I get the idea, that it was like a chocolatey, nutty, syrupy shot. No mention of adding sugar or milk.
What's your espresso machine and grinder if you don't mind me asking? I found the Cartapani to be pretty easy to get chocolate, caramel and nuts close to 200F, 16g, anywhere from 1:1.5-2. I'm not sure about syrupy though, a few of the folks who have tried Cartapani Cinquestelle thought that it lacked a body/density so it won't feel particularly syrupy.

In other Italian style roasted coffee beans, I found Blasercafe (Swiss Roaster but has membership in Italian Caffè Speciali Certificati) to fit into this category pretty well. I got 1 of each of the Rosso Nero, Marrone, and Lilla E Rose blends. If I were to rate them it would be Lilla E Rose, Marrone, then Rosso Nero. I preferred the medium roast Lilla over Marrone and Rosso which were medium dark. Marrone is very nice for a chocolatey nutty cappa/latte and Lilla with its hint of floral and acidic notes was flexible for straight shots and milk. Rosso Nero was a bit one dimensional for me, but very much dark chocolate and nuts. These were all pulled 14-16g dose, 198 to 201F, 1:1.5 to 2 with the darker blends pulling a bit slightly cooler, lower dose, and yield. I've been amped a bit as these blends are 20-30% Robusta. Got them off EnjoyBetterCoffee and expiry was 1/2022 so not the freshest but very enjoyable and easy to pull.

Next up is Mokaflor Oro then Hausbrandt's Nonne blend after that.

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jpender

#283: Post by jpender »

coffeechan wrote:What's your espresso machine and grinder if you don't mind me asking? I found the Cartapani to be pretty easy to get chocolate, caramel and nuts close to 200F, 16g, anywhere from 1:1.5-2.
I have a Cafelat Robot and a Kinu M47 Phoenix. All but the most recent shots I pulled were 18g. Yesterday I experimented with 15g and 14g. The best shots I got were on the shorter side of the range you mentioned and with the Robot preheated so that the temperature started at about 197°F and finished around 190°F.

I am admittedly not particularly experienced nor talented with espresso. I bought a bag Blue Bottle Hayes Valley the other day at the supermarket. It's darker than I prefer but was the freshest coffee they had in stock. Each of the five shots I've pulled with those beans have been so much better than any of the two dozen or so with the Cartapani.

I'm not saying that it's the beans; it might well be me or my equipment. I don't know. If you PM your address I'll mail you a 250g vacuum bag of some of these beans that are in my freezer right now. I'd love to know your opinion.

coffeechan

#284: Post by coffeechan »

Not much else I can say besides you may not like the beans or the batch that you have may have come out roasted up to par. I assume you are using the usual high pressure at the start and a declining pressure as the shot advances. This should already mitigate the bite and any astringency on the tail end. I don't know of anything else I can recommend.

Hayes Valley is a good coffee choice for a darker side of medium roast. If you are looking for fresher Robusta containing blends, you can try Buon Giorno coffee. Their Autunno blend has been received very positively. Mr. Espresso is favorite of some as well though I am unsure if any of the coffees they have contain Robusta.

Thanks for the offer of the Cartapani, but I am all set for awhile. Plenty of other Italian roasters to try :) .

njtnjt
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#285: Post by njtnjt »

For a slightly darker than medium Italian roast I am really enjoying Steamroller by New Harvest in RI. Bittersweet chocolate, toasted nuts and a creamy cocoa with some very subtle lemon in the finish. I'm dosing at 17grm in, 34 out at 200 degrees in my Linea Mini.
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-Nicholas

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jpender

#286: Post by jpender »

coffeechan wrote:Not much else I can say besides you may not like the beans or the batch that you have may have come out roasted up to par. I assume you are using the usual high pressure at the start and a declining pressure as the shot advances. This should already mitigate the bite and any astringency on the tail end. I don't know of anything else I can recommend.
It would be interesting to me to know which of those it is. But if it's really one or the other then there's no point in continuing to try.

Another coffee addition to the compost bin. It's hardly the first. And while I'm at it I think I'll get rid of another, similar bag in my freezer. That one was also a highly recommended coffee on a thread on HB. I'm not complaining; it's just a part of exploring.

henri

#287: Post by henri »

One thing I really like about the third wave is the focus on responsibly sourced coffee (e.g. organic coffee direct-traded from farmers' cooperatives). Yet none of the specialty coffee roasters I've so far tried produce a blend that's as Italianate as I'd like. On the other hand, I haven't seen this focus on sustainability in Italian coffee - probably because, living outside of Italy, I only get to see the usual brands of big companies who do export abroad but probably aren't that interested in making the world a better place...

Has anyone found an "ethical" coffee blended and roasted in the Italian style? Are any of the major Italian brands better than the rest in terms of social and environmental responsibility? I know the SCA has a chapter in Italy, but I haven't been able to find a list of member roasters or anything like that (and who knows, they might be surfing the third wave too and not blend and roast in the traditional Italian style...).

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GregoryJ

#288: Post by GregoryJ »

henri wrote:One thing I really like about the third wave is the focus on responsibly sourced coffee (e.g. organic coffee direct-traded from farmers' cooperatives). Yet none of the specialty coffee roasters I've so far tried produce a blend that's as Italianate as I'd like.
You can look into Northbound Coffee Roasters. The Prana blend is one of their darker ones, I don't think it has any robusta though. They also have more seasonal blends which I've heard good things about, but probably won't remind you of Italian blends.

You can also look into Sweet Maria's. While they are famous for the green beans, they do roast some of them. If you can find some of their roasted "Espresso Monkey" I think it would be great. I don't know if they have any certifications, but I think they have good relationships with the farms they buy from.

noisewater

#289: Post by noisewater »

I'm currently in Rome and I just stumbled upon a little caffe called D'Angelo Caffè & Gastronomia and I just experienced the best shot of espresso I've ever had in my life!
They serve a Napoli coffee called Moka Gold (www.mokagold.it) and are the only bar I've found in Italy so far that literally pulls shots, as they use a lever espresso machine. The blend they use is the Delizia blend (green bag).
I'm not sure if these beans have been mentioned in this thread (sorry if it has, I've only gotten half way through), but wanted to add it to the list for anyone wanting some incredible Italian beans.