How long are coffee beans REALLY fresh? - Page 4

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
Espresso_Junky

Postby Espresso_Junky » Jun 12, 2019, 3:16 pm

sluflyer06 wrote:I worry about not being good enough at it and either having to just give up on the investment of the roaster or ending up with subpar coffee. I do have a couple friends that home roast but they both moved away.


I sure wasn't worried and knew if others (professional and home level) could successfully do it then I could as well. In the past I've used thousands of pounds of different coffees (primarily for espresso) for home/commercial use from some of the best artisan roasters nationwide. What I get from home roasting has kept me quite satisfied for over 3 years now. Seriously doubt I'll ever spend another $ on roasted coffee. My home devised/built roaster has long paid for itself, so that wasn't a concern either. It's a matter of sourcing high quality green coffee(s) and find the right roast level you like for a particular brew method and just work on maximizing that for taste/consistency.

trapperkeeper

Postby trapperkeeper » Jun 12, 2019, 3:25 pm

yep, about 2-3 weeks for me. After that, still very drinkable but just not as "fresh" smell and taste wise. So I only buy 2 bags (12-16 oz per bag ) at a time. If i do 3 it takes too long to go through them and some of the punch is gone.. my 0.02
LMWDP #600

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jesse

Postby jesse » Jun 13, 2019, 7:23 am

Anecdotally I find that roasted filter coffee typically peaks at day 4, and still swear by the method of letting it off-gas in the bag for a few days, then transferring to single serving sized, airtight containers (2 oz jars in this case) and putting into deep freeze. Pull as needed.

jeffg2020

Postby jeffg2020 » replying to jesse » Jun 15, 2019, 4:28 pm

What about freezing for espresso? I've heard it's a no-no.

Espresso_Junky

Postby Espresso_Junky » replying to jeffg2020 » Jun 15, 2019, 5:46 pm

Those that claim that either haven't tried it or did so and failed in the process. For quite some time I bought 5# bags of quality roasted to order blends for espresso, let it age 4-5 days post roast, then vacuum pack/deep freeze in Mason jars. Whether a jar was 1 week old or 1 month old once thawed/opened it tasted/extracted like it was still 4-5 days post roast. What really impressed me was vacuum packing/deep freezing some decaf I used commercially and left it in the freezer for 7 weeks. Thawed/used and it was still characteristic of being 3-4 days post roast. Decaf for espresso fades quickly and preserving it to that level was awesome.

Bret

Postby Bret » Jun 15, 2019, 6:30 pm

jeffg2020 wrote:What about freezing for espresso? I've heard it's a no-no.


I buy the 5 single pound bags of Josuma Malabar Gold (instead of a single 5 pound bag). Josuma recommended placing a single pound bag inside a ziplock style freezer bag (gallon size works well), pressing air out when sealing it, etc. Then taking it out, leaving it on the counter overnight still in the freezer bag. This really works well for me. I prep single doses from a single bag.

I just finished a bag that was in the freezer for 77 days. It behaved exactly the same as the first bag (which was not frozen at all) and the other frozen bags used prior to this last one. I keep notes on almost every shot pulled, and I can refer back to compare settings.

Others have had success grinding straight from the freezer without thawing. I haven't tried this, as my workflow is built around single dosing in bean cellars. But I have no reason to doubt that it works.

It's pretty easy to test out.

jeffg2020

Postby jeffg2020 » replying to Bret » Yesterday, 12:22 am

I would assume there would be a sort of temperature shock to the beans if you ground & exposed them to hot water while they were still at freezer temp. But maybe not...

Bret

Postby Bret » replying to jeffg2020 » Yesterday, 3:17 am

Based on what others have shared, a change in grind setting is required as frozen beans are more 'brittle'. If I recall correctly (a BIG if), one grinds frozen beans at a coarser setting since they are more brittle and will produce more fines as a result. But someone who actually does it can chime in.

I've not seen any reports about actual issues with condensation, which is what I would have been more concerned about otherwise. Seems to be a non-issue.

Even if thermal shock is a factor, it probably gets accounted-for/offset-by the dialing in for taste process, anyway.

jpender

Postby jpender » Yesterday, 6:14 am

jeffg2020 wrote:I would assume there would be a sort of temperature shock to the beans if you ground & exposed them to hot water while they were still at freezer temp. But maybe not...


Thermal shock usually refers to the situation where a sudden temperature change results in a large gradient that causes fracturing. I think this is implausible in the case of coffee at a typical freezer temperature. Do you think you could crack cold beans by immersing them in hot water? Besides, by the time grinding is done the coffee will have warmed up considerably.

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Spitz.me

Postby Spitz.me » Yesterday, 7:03 am

jeffg2020 wrote:I would assume there would be a sort of temperature shock to the beans if you ground & exposed them to hot water while they were still at freezer temp. But maybe not...


Freezing beans for longer term use is not a myth. In fact, there are probably hundreds of pages on this forum on, not only anecdotal evidence that it works, but a few with some real experimentation as well.
I know I've pulled a great shot when the flavour is 'like a beany taste that tastes like a bean'.