How long are coffee beans REALLY fresh? - Page 2

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
jeffg2020 (original poster)

#11: Post by jeffg2020 (original poster) »

Guys, these are great/interesting answers, thx.

I should clarify: I only drink espresso either as a shot or a capp.

jeffg2020 (original poster)

#12: Post by jeffg2020 (original poster) replying to jeffg2020 »

Also: sounds like what I'm hearing is after a couple weeks there's a slow drop-off in freshness, though it will depend on lightness/darkness of roast. But probably for most beans you have a good month where you can extract a good shot. Of course a milk drink will be more forgiving.

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SiempreTuParceroMike

#13: Post by SiempreTuParceroMike »

The question itself likely has no answer, much like the question, "who is the greatest basketball player of all time," or, "how do you keep your wife happy?" :lol:

In my experience and with my equipment, I notice a drop-off in taste and crema between 8-12 days after the roast date. For pour-over and drip it's more like two weeks.
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yakster
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#14: Post by yakster »

SiempreTuParceroMike wrote:I notice a drop-off in taste and crema between 8-12 days after the roast date.
How long after roasting do you start using your coffee for espresso?
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Randy G.

#15: Post by Randy G. »

SiempreTuParceroMike wrote:The question itself likely has no answer, much like the question, "how do you keep your wife happy?"

In my experience and with my equipment, I notice a drop-off in taste and crema between 8-12 days after the roast date. For pour-over and drip it's more like two weeks.
I was about to type something along those very same lines. A coffee begins to drop off when you sip the beverage and think, 'This tastes a little off.' A day or three later when you sip and think, 'Ewww.. This is not as good as the other day,' the coffee is too old for you.

An acquaintance has nothing but big red jugs of preground and says fresh, 'specialty' coffee tastes like a band aid. He obviously likes his coffee pre-staled. For espresso, I can taste my home roast drop off about ten days after roasting.

As far as keeping a wife happy. As of last Thursday I only have 48 years' experience so do not consider myself sufficiently knowledgeable to offer useful advice.
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sluflyer06

#16: Post by sluflyer06 »

Espresso_Junky wrote:That's why home roasting is simply awesome if you have the time/means to do it. I average paying around $7/lb when everything is factored in. The way I roast/rotate my jars each batch is 7-9 days old max by the time I open/use it. I never plan to buy roasted coffee the rest of my espresso life.
I worry about not being good enough at it and either having to just give up on the investment of the roaster or ending up with subpar coffee. I do have a couple friends that home roast but they both moved away.

Nick Name

#17: Post by Nick Name »

SiempreTuParceroMike wrote:"how do you keep your wife happy?" :lol:
I'm not sure, but I have this feeling that it may have something to do with not buying new coffee gear all the time. :wink:

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keno

#18: Post by keno »

Most people on HB are WAY too obsessive about freshness. I'd definitely stay away from grocery store coffee with best by dates that could be a year out, but I wouldn't worry at all about coffee that's only a few weeks off roast.

Read this article: A challenging idea about fresh coffee

This is a good overview on freshness:
Is Your Coffee Too Fresh?
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discsinthesky

#19: Post by discsinthesky »

I'm wondering to what degree the "drop off" that is being noted by many here could be counteracted by tweaking the extraction parameters, grind settings, etc.? And if it is possible to extend that peak window, what general adjustments do you make as a bean ages and what is the total usable window in your opinion?

lagoon

#20: Post by lagoon »

keno wrote:I'd definitely stay away from grocery store coffee with best by dates that could be a year out, but I wouldn't worry at all about coffee that's only a few weeks off roast.
That's probably the best answer. Supermarket beans are often many months old and are often shipped from Europe by sea container. So yes, definitely avoid these.

But a few weeks old, straight from a roaster, no problem.

As another poster indicated, roast beans don't fall off a cliff like dairy or meat.