Espresso Napoletano and Thoughts - Page 3

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
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Moka 1 Cup

Postby Moka 1 Cup » Mar 22, 2019, 3:13 pm

IamOiman wrote:......I have never tried Illy dark roast, but my experience with the company is their roasts are a little lighter than most Neapolitan Roasts. Saka's roasts are light for Naples, and I think it may be comparable in darkness if that is what you search for.

Thanks.
Illy Dark Roast is quite .... dark :) . In tems of flavor it is the most intense I know. More intense than Mexico by Passalacqua to mention a napoletano with 100% Arabica that I know well. I describe it as bitter dark chocolate. No acidity, fruit, flowers, and so on.
four minutes to make an espresso? really?

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IamOiman

Postby IamOiman » Mar 22, 2019, 6:04 pm

The darkest roast offered by Passalacqua is Moana. If you have not tried that it is the darkest roast I have tried besides maybe Toraldo Linea Rossa no 80.
-Ryan
I'll throw my portafilter in the ring
LMWDP #612

cskorton

Postby cskorton » Mar 26, 2019, 7:55 pm

Ciao Ryan!

I really enjoyed your post. I've always liked Italian style espresso, especially from the South, more so than American third wave stuff. It's almost like two totally different drinks!

Anyway, could you give some instruction on how to recreate un caffe napoletana a casa? How do we get that luscious, thick, syrupy, chocolatey shot like we get in Napoli?

What would the brew ratio and extraction times be like? What about the kind of grinder or machine? Does it have to be a lever?

By the way, have you ever used or seen anyone in Napoli use a Napoletana coffee pot? I have a very old one that's been in the family for a long time that I've been curious to use.

Grazie mille!

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slybarman

Postby slybarman » Mar 26, 2019, 8:04 pm

How would Malobar Gold compare to the napoletano espressos you describe?

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IamOiman

Postby IamOiman » Mar 27, 2019, 7:45 am

cskorton wrote:Anyway, could you give some instruction on how to recreate un caffe napoletana a casa? How do we get that luscious, thick, syrupy, chocolatey shot like we get in Napoli?

By the way, have you ever used or seen anyone in Napoli use a Napoletana coffee pot? I have a very old one that's been in the family for a long time that I've been curious to use.


Hi Chris,

This video is a nice intro to using a Neapolitan pot http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WG8ziQATQw (but is in Italian). If you need translation I can do it if needed.

Neapolitan pots will not be as thick or have a large amount of body compared to espresso or even moka pots as no pressure is involved with the process. Instead, gravity is utilized, where water is heated to boiling, left to cool for about a minute, then flip the pot over to allow the hot water to go through the grounds.

Neapolitan pots came before the moka pot, and were relatively superseded in popularity outside of Naples/Campania. It still works but they are not as popular as they once were at the peak in the first three decades of the 1900's.
-Ryan
I'll throw my portafilter in the ring
LMWDP #612

HRC-E.B.

Postby HRC-E.B. » Mar 27, 2019, 2:18 pm

slybarman wrote:How would Malobar Gold compare to the napoletano espressos you describe?


Also interested in the answer to that question. MG has been a favorite of mine but I have lately found it to be a tad more bitter than I prefer. Wonder if it's just my tastes evolving or if there's something in my prep that exacerbates this?

ojt

Postby ojt » Apr 13, 2019, 8:36 am

Nice thread, thanks!

I have some Passalacqua - got 4 bags from relatives livin in Napoli - but am finding it very hard to finish them! In the sense that I just don't like the resulting coffee. I am using a La Pavoni though, so that might affect my bean preferences (very fresh roast required). Currently using a local roast here in Verona and the result with my equipment and skills (or lack thereof) is much better for my taste.

As far as bar coffee goes it gets more complicated.. I do think I've had better coffee in the south, in random bars. Tends to be thicker in south as already mentioned here, whereas the north italian coffee is nore liquid and bland, often quite horrid in fact.

For me currently the perfect balance between the two extremes - thick and dark robusta flavored southern italian coffee, and super light roast fruity acidy northern europan coffee - is fresh light north italian roast :)

Oh and with neapolitans you absolutely have to mention their pride for their coffee. Their coffee of course is the best in there is, hands down, and most likely they invented coffee!
Osku