Espresso coating left in cup a desirable thing?

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
Ken5
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#1: Post by Ken5 »

Here is another newbie question, sorry.

I notice that different espresso shots will leave a film on my white espresso cup differently. Some will leave a good solid coating on the entire inside of the cup where the espresso was, where some will leave uneven rings as the level drops, and some leave hardly any coating at all. Which is more desirable? Time that the espresso sat in cup is not a factor, it disappears quite quickly. :)

I am assuming that the more solid the coating there is the more oil there was in the shot, is this it? If this coating means something what should I be doing to make it more consistent either way?

Thanks!

Ken

Jeff
Team HB

#2: Post by Jeff »

I'm guessing it's a mix of crema and oils from the espresso. I've never worried about what was left in the cup as I've always been on to making the next one. Well, at not least past washing out the cup and spoon.

While you may not agree with his conclusions, nor do I think this can easily guide a choice of extraction, I do appreciate James Hoffmann's willingness to try most anything...

(The oil is revealed around 3:15, if you want to skip ahead.)

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jpender

#3: Post by jpender »

I've always thought the dirty film on the cup was mostly undissolved solids. Or maybe that's just in my cup. :-)

Hoffmann is fun to watch. He's got great hair. And a spoon that's definitely not something you'd find in a lab. But did he really taste pure oil or a combination of things? He doesn't know what he tasted and neither do we.

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another_jim
Team HB

#4: Post by another_jim »

A fun new question :lol:

My memory of everyday shots (no experimental confirmation) is that it is crema related. An old school medium roast with some robuists will leave a solid coating on the cup (and if its a good robusta, its well worth licking off with ones finger) whereas a lightly roasted washed SO that requires a profiled shot will leave hardly anything at all.
Jim Schulman

Ken5 (original poster)
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#5: Post by Ken5 (original poster) »

Thanks Jeff, John and Jim!

A different kind of question anyways Jim. Unfortunately I have plenty of unusual questions. :)

Since I am going for consistency in everything perhaps one day I will figure out if it is anything that I am doing.

Ken

Ken5 (original poster)
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#6: Post by Ken5 (original poster) »

Got done with my shot today and after looking at my cup I remembered posting this thread. Here is a photo of tonight's cup.



Normal?

Ken

jpender

#7: Post by jpender »


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Ken5 (original poster)
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#8: Post by Ken5 (original poster) »

The photo of my cup is the dirtiest it ever is, and it had time to dry out a bit, but I don't think I ever had a cup that looked that clean.

Jeff
Team HB

#9: Post by Jeff »

I get a reasonable amount of "residue" in my cups. It's probably less than yours as I usually pull lighter roasts that tend not to generate much crema. It's usually oily enough that I need a touch of soap to clean it out.

Based on the photo's timestamp, this is the remains of a shot of Ethopia Guji Kercha, natural, La Cabra (light), held 30+ days after roast; Niche Zero, DE1.


Ken5 (original poster)
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#10: Post by Ken5 (original poster) »

Thanks Jeff,

Yours looks very wet and oily, mine dries out quickly, but unlike you I pour boiling water in my cup before the shot and probably drink it sooner too.

Rubbing my finger in my dry coating it seems gritty, so probably not all oil.

Ken