Espresso brew temperatures on medium roast coffees

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
chanty 77

#1: Post by chanty 77 »

I'm very new at using various brew temps for espresso roasts--medium roasts, a few medium-dark (never all dark, too burnt/smoky for my liking). Anyway, some of the mediums I have tried tend to be a little more of a lighter medium than I'm used to--so have put up to 203° on the PID. Today, I realized the new blend I was trying must've been a more true Medium--as 203° gave it more of a smoky flavor didn't care for. Tomorrow will try it at 200°. This particular roast was Nossa Full Cycle. Anyone? Thanks.

User avatar
Jeff
Team HB

#2: Post by Jeff »

Higher temperatures can extract more from the coffee. Medium and darker roasts often have unpleasant roast bitterness. Higher temperatures, finer grind, and longer ratios can accentuate these flavors.

chanty 77 (original poster)

#3: Post by chanty 77 (original poster) »

Thanks.

DamianWarS

#4: Post by DamianWarS »

chanty 77 wrote:I'm very new at using various brew temps for espresso roasts--medium roasts, a few medium-dark (never all dark, too burnt/smoky for my liking). Anyway, some of the mediums I have tried tend to be a little more of a lighter medium than I'm used to--so have put up to 203° on the PID. Today, I realized the new blend I was trying must've been a more true Medium--as 203° gave it more of a smoky flavor didn't care for. Tomorrow will try it at 200°. This particular roast was Nossa Full Cycle. Anyone? Thanks.
temperature differences are another nuance of extracting coffee. We all understand the finer the grind the quicker it will extract and this is the same with temp, the hotter the temp the quicker it will extract. if your shots are sour you can increase the temp to try and extract more, likewise, if your shots are bitter you can lower the temp to extract less. However, normally grind is the first tool you pull out to change the extraction and you don't lead with temp but as you dial in further you might find adjusting the temp makes it hit the sweet spot. broadly speaking, if it's a light roast higher temps work better and if it's a dark roast lower temps work better. some coffee has roast defects in it and although it is light, medium, etc... it has a smoky taste to it. this can be caused when the roaster doesn't have sufficient airflow to exhaust the smoke so it builds up and the coffee absorbs it. it can also be caused by tipping which is when the beans are heated up too quickly and a little black dot appears at the end of the bean. poor development of the bean can also be a factor where the inside is roasted inconsistent with the outside. you can crunch a whole mean in your month and taste some of these defects directly or cup them to determine its flavour without all the nuances of espresso getting in the way. if it's a roast defect I'll often go under 90C or under (194F) to avoid these undesired flavours.

chanty 77 (original poster)

#5: Post by chanty 77 (original poster) replying to DamianWarS »

Thank you so much for this. Very interesting & helpful!