Cupping how to...

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
mattwells

Postby mattwells » Jan 22, 2007, 9:59 am

I can pull shots that I enjoy. Before I sold my Expobar, I even knew that my wife liked the espresso brewed at a slightly higher temperature (on most blends) than I did. I can say this is really good espresso and this is less good.

What I want to do, and can't, is describe the flavor in any meaningful way. My question is: how do you make the jump from 'I like [X] more than [Y] and all I did was [dose a little more, brew a little hotter, etc.]' to cupping notes on particular blends. I can identify some flavors, but usually only after I am told they are there (like when I got a pound of CCC's Toscano - I could taste the slight hazelnut and chocolate, but doubt I would have if I hadn't known that was what was in the blend - perhaps I was even forcing those flavors on my palate).

What is a good way to further my coffee palate?

[As a side note, one reason I have become more interested in this is my recent increase in home roasting and my even more recent purchase of BobRoseman's HotTop.]

Thanks for any advice or links (I searched, but couldn't find anything dealing with this specifically either here or elsewhere).

/mw
Matt Wells

LMWDP #160

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RegulatorJohnson

Postby RegulatorJohnson » Jan 22, 2007, 10:08 am

look at this flavor wheel while you drink it. (http://www.sweetmarias.com/tastewheel.html)

ill read all the sections and think yes or no. then i can eliminate, narrow down, and identify what im tasting.

also i like to push espresso flavored air into the back of my throat/nose can help taste aromas. i taste whisky the same.

the flavor wheel is fun to use.

i like to taste with my eyes closed sometimes.

jon
jon stovall
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coffeetoolsapp.com

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another_jim
Team HB

Postby another_jim » Jan 22, 2007, 1:01 pm

Coffeeresearch.org has industry cupping instructions; Bob and I have posted an informal guide to just tasting coffee and more formal home cupping instructions.

If you read all these, you'll see that, as usual, the exact technique is nearly irrelevant. Practicing a lot and getting into the habit of analyzing what you are tasting are what really count.

Um, Jon, the flavor wheels are copyrighted; and shouldn't be reproduced without Ted Lingle's permission (SM is the only site, afaik, that has permission: a text link to their page is great; but hijacking their image in an img statement is probably a no-no, so I removed it -- Dan can restore it if I'm wrong).
Jim Schulman

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RegulatorJohnson

Postby RegulatorJohnson » Jan 22, 2007, 1:14 pm

another_jim wrote:Um, Jon, the flavor wheels are copyrighted; and shouldn't be reproduced without Ted Lingle's permission (SM is the only site, afaik, that has permission: a text link to their page is great; but hijacking their image in an img statement is probably a no-no, so I removed it -- Dan can restore it if I'm wrong).



hey im totally sorry if i stepped on anyones copyright. being an artist i understand.

it wont happen again.

jon
jon stovall
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coffeetoolsapp.com

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jesawdy

Postby jesawdy » Jan 22, 2007, 1:48 pm

CG has this article Beginner's Guide to Cupping
Jeff Sawdy

mattwells

Postby mattwells » Jan 24, 2007, 9:15 pm

Thanks for the replies - I knew there was stuff out there I had not turned up. I will definitely have to order a poster of the wheel when I next order from Sweet Maria's.
Matt Wells



LMWDP #160

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Jasonian

Postby Jasonian » Jan 26, 2007, 4:28 pm

Matt, you have an email heading your way.
Owner - AJ Coffee Company
HB Rocks!

PheasantCreek

Postby PheasantCreek » Jan 27, 2007, 4:27 pm

One thing you might try is pull straight single origin shots that make up the blend. Not all espresso blends are transparent on the origins as CCC but it is fun. We moved from Toscano 2006 to our own blend of Brazil, Sumatra Gayo and PNG. This week I was pulling straight PNG shots and really enjoyed them.