Coffee recommendations similar to Vivace Dolce

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
Alestz

#1: Post by Alestz »

Does anyone know the origins of the beans used in Vivace's Dolce blend? I am looking to try other roasters but want to keep the heavy body I like from Dolce consistent. Opened some Malabar Gold this morning which seemed to be fairly similar but it was not nearly as textured in my opinion

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Spitz.me

#2: Post by Spitz.me »

I'd also be interested to know of some nearly identical blends. I've seen Lusso coffees recommended, but they're not close enough. Malabar Gold is definitely not like Dolce. I still struggle to understand the high level of recommendations for MG in general.
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nameisjoey

#3: Post by nameisjoey »

Nothing to add but subscribing to this post as I am interested as well.

dparrish
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#4: Post by dparrish »

Best comparison I've had is to a mostly arabica Italian blend, such as from Saka Caffe from Napoli. David Schomer based his blends on those he enjoyed in Italy, and they do a great job of recreating the syrupy and caramel notes, but without using robusta (originally Schomer did use robusta, as the Italians like to do, but I came late to the game long after he discontinued using it as part of his blends). By formulating Dolce (and Vita, designed for milk) to be pulled as a ristretto, Schomer is able to come close to the thickness of Italian shots using robusta. IMO, the Italian blends tend to have more complexity, including a nuttiness that is evidentially a characteristic of adding good robusta to the "miscela"/mix. But it's difficult to get Italian coffee truly as fresh as what Espresso Vivace offers here, and if it isn't REALLY fresh, you lose some sweetness. And I've really found nothing as lusciously sweet as Dolce. Vita BTW has a bit more of a winey note, a little more complex. Both are great, and I currently subscribe to Vita.

Alestz (original poster)

#5: Post by Alestz (original poster) »

dparrish wrote:Best comparison I've had is to a mostly arabica Italian blend, such as from Sakka Caffe from Napoli. David Schomer based his blends on those he enjoyed in Italy, and they do a great job of recreating the syrupy and caramel notes, but without using robusta (originally Schomer did use robusta, as the Italians like to do, but I came late to the game long after he discontinued using it as part of his blends). By formulating Dolce (and Vita, designed for milk) to be pulled as a ristretto, Schomer is able to come close to the thickness of Italian shots using robusta. IMO, the Italian blends tend to have more complexity, including a nuttiness that is evidentially a characteristic of adding good robusta to the "miscela"/mix. But it's difficult to get Italian coffee truly as fresh as what Espresso Vivace offers here, and if it isn't REALLY fresh, you lose some sweetness. And I've really found nothing as lusciously sweet as Dolce. Vita BTW has a bit more of a winey note, a little more complex. Both are great, and I currently subscribe to Vita.
Thanks for the reply! Would you say Vivace's blend profiles have more to do with the roast level and not a particular origin?

nameisjoey

#6: Post by nameisjoey »

dparrish wrote:Best comparison I've had is to a mostly arabica Italian blend, such as from Sakka Caffe from Napoli. David Schomer based his blends on those he enjoyed in Italy, and they do a great job of recreating the syrupy and caramel notes, but without using robusta (originally Schomer did use robusta, as the Italians like to do, but I came late to the game long after he discontinued using it as part of his blends). By formulating Dolce (and Vita, designed for milk) to be pulled as a ristretto, Schomer is able to come close to the thickness of Italian shots using robusta. IMO, the Italian blends tend to have more complexity, including a nuttiness that is evidentially a characteristic of adding good robusta to the "miscela"/mix. But it's difficult to get Italian coffee truly as fresh as what Espresso Vivace offers here, and if it isn't REALLY fresh, you lose some sweetness. And I've really found nothing as lusciously sweet as Dolce. Vita BTW has a bit more of a winey note, a little more complex. Both are great, and I currently subscribe to Vita.
Which Sakka blend are you referring to?

dparrish
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#7: Post by dparrish »

Alestz wrote:Thanks for the reply! Would you say Vivace's blend profiles have more to do with the roast level and not a particular origin?
My guess is both play a role. Both Dolce and Vita are expertly roasted to just past second crack (apparently), just enough to create caramel notes. Vita is roasted slightly darker, but never oily.There is a wineyness in both blends which is an indication of some complexity. They aren't as complex as the best Italian blends I've had, but the level of caramel sweetness is at the highest level among the many blends I've tried.

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dparrish
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#8: Post by dparrish »

nameisjoey wrote:Which Sakka blend are you referring to?
The only one I've had the pleasure of trying thus far is the Gran Bar, which is an arabica/robusta blend (80/20 I think), but Saka offer an all-arabica blend that others have tried and like. Look at the thread here:
Saka Caffè in the States

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Spitz.me

#9: Post by Spitz.me »

I guess an iterative approach here (that I'm interested in) is how easy/hard has it been for someone to buy the greens and roast Dolce to be what they expect?

I'm wondering if I'm romanticizing my last taste of the Dolce of 5 years ago now. I've had some pretty nice and tasty Lavazza blends like the Gold Selection and the Super Crema. Now I'm curious if they are close enough to whet the appetite... The shipping from Vivace is pretty expensive...
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slybarman

#10: Post by slybarman »

Was just on the Vivace website. Have not tried it before. Am I missing something or do they only sell 12 oz bags? Shipping is a bit high too.