Coffee Bean Freezing & Degradation - Page 2

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
jpender

#11: Post by jpender »

dsc106 wrote:I do one dose at a time, and freeze a vac sealed bag of 120g-200g. I need to wait for them to thaw to prevent condensation/moisture on the beans. Wouldn't hurt the first 20g dose, but storing the rest after condensation for a week would.
Is that claim based on experience or presumption?

I ask because there are many people who do exactly what you are worried will cause a problem and have no problem. I've actually measured the accumulated moisture on beans treated in that fashion and it was essentially zero.

Try it.

dsc106 (original poster)

#12: Post by dsc106 (original poster) »

jpender wrote:Is that claim based on experience or presumption?

I ask because there are many people who do exactly what you are worried will cause a problem and have no problem. I've actually measured the accumulated moisture on beans treated in that fashion and it was essentially zero.
Haven't tried it, interesting. But, I think it misses the main point - I only drink a single 20g dose a day. So let's say I pull the bag out of the freezer and immediately open all the beans. I use the first 20g dose from frozen, I know that will work well and maybe even better.

But it still doesn't have any benefit for the other 100-180g of beans that will take a week+ to use. Even if opening without thawing doesn't cause damage to those other beans, it also doesn't help them - except the first dose. Which I wasn't having a problem with to begin with.

jpender

#13: Post by jpender »

dsc106 wrote:But it still doesn't have any benefit for the other 100-180g of beans that will take a week+ to use. Even if opening without thawing doesn't cause damage to those other beans, it also doesn't help them...
It will if they degrade as a result of thawing. Isn't that the case with the coffee that prompted you to start this thread?

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JohnB.
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#14: Post by JohnB. »

BruceWayne wrote:Is there any reason you need to thaw the beans? Grinding frozen beans seems perfectly fine for me.
It's worked fine for me for a number of years. I've yet to see any moisture on the cold beans but if you did how is that any different from spritzing the beans with water to reduce static? Nobody seems to think that's a problem.
LMWDP 267

jpender

#15: Post by jpender »

Just because the moisture isn't visible doesn't mean it isn't there. It's trivial to verify that cold beans do in fact gain a small amount of moisture weight when exposed to room temperature air.

What I found, however, is that it doesn't accumulate on beans in a container that is repeatedly opened to measure out a dose and then returned to the freezer. The amount of added moisture on the remaining beans is negligible.

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JohnB.
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#16: Post by JohnB. »

jpender wrote:Just because the moisture isn't visible doesn't mean it isn't there. It's trivial to verify that cold beans do in fact gain a small amount of moisture weight when exposed to room temperature air.
Define small? What moisture weight gain have you actually measured?
LMWDP 267

jpender

#17: Post by jpender »

About 0.1%.

chr514

#18: Post by chr514 »

do dosing before frozen, with 50ml tube or 8*12mm sealed bag.

jpender

#19: Post by jpender »

What if I decide to use a different dose tomorrow?

BruceWayne

#20: Post by BruceWayne »

That is an issue with pre-measuring. I dial the coffee in before freezing and then freeze my doses. Grinding is just throw the frozen bean in and verify that the ground weight isn't too far off the expected dose.