Best brew temperature for Lavazza blends?

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
cpro48609

Postby cpro48609 » Mar 22, 2019, 12:31 am

I've been using Lavazza Super Crema and it seems to be very good. However I am newer to this world so I might not have the palate to truly tell good from great, or from not so good for that matter.

I have my machine (Pro 600) set for 200 brew temp. This seems like a standard average for most blends. Does anyone know for Lavazza blends is 200 a good temp? I am trying (it's on the way) their sample pack with Super Crema, Gold, and Pienaroma.

My favorite tastes are more chocolately and nutty instead of fruity. I heard the Gold might be a little better for these tastes then the Super Crema. I'm just wondering if I should tryout different temps or leave at 200 for these?

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SomersetDee

Postby SomersetDee » Mar 22, 2019, 6:57 am

Hi
So 200F being 93.3°C is definitely lower than what I regularly use. Whenever I don't get time to roast at home, I buy Lavazza Qualita Rossa blend beans. Which also means that we have it a lot of the time!! The setting I use is much higher at 95.6°C (in Fahrenheit 204F) and grind it slightly coarser and slightly over filled. I have never felt that Lavazza has sugary or fruity taste at lower temperature. I find underextraction and sourness creeping in at lower temp. At 204F it appears to have a typical chocolate emphasis. It makes a strong chocolatey espresso. It is also easy to overextract add woody bitterness. There are real experts here who may give better temp recommendations. I am surprised to see no good search results for brew temp recommendations for such a popular shop beans. In your question if you meant Lavazza Qualia Rossa and not Lavazza Espresso (black packaging)? My answer only relates to the red Rossa. Most UK shops dot sell the black version.

cpro48609

Postby cpro48609 » replying to SomersetDee » Mar 22, 2019, 10:58 am

Awesome thanks! I think I'm going to experiment with some different temps and see what it does.

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mariobarba

Postby mariobarba » Mar 22, 2019, 11:05 am

The Lavazza blends you guys mention are typically used for Moka pots. I generally prefer Lavazza coffees sold as part of their bar series that come in blue packaging for espresso. Top Class is my favorite, although the price here in Canada has gone up substantially over the last 5 years.

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SomersetDee

Postby SomersetDee » Mar 22, 2019, 1:31 pm

mariobarba wrote:The Lavazza blends you guys mention are typically used for Moka pots. I generally prefer Lavazza coffees sold as part of their bar series that come in blue packaging for espresso. Top Class is my favourite, although the price here in Canada has gone up substantially over the last 5 years.

UK is not exactly Coffee dominant. Coffee still plays second fiddle to Tea. Perhaps the variation is simply a marketing gimmick?? The Lavazza Qualia Rossa is sold in the Uk as an espresso blend.
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fslharoon

Postby fslharoon » Mar 23, 2019, 3:59 pm

mariobarba wrote:The Lavazza blends you guys mention are typically used for Moka pots. I generally prefer Lavazza coffees sold as part of their bar series that come in blue packaging for espresso. Top Class is my favorite, although the price here in Canada has gone up substantially over the last 5 years.


yes you are right

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mariobarba

Postby mariobarba » Mar 25, 2019, 12:31 pm

SomersetDee wrote:The Lavazza Qualia Rossa is sold in the Uk as an espresso

The problem lies in translation. Italians refer to coffee from a Moka pot as an espresso or simply un caffe. Very few italians will have espresso equipment at home and rather go to the bar for a real espresso. The qualita rossa is thus marketed as a home espresso coffee (ie moka pot espresso) and the Bar line as a bar espresso coffee (espresso machine).

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SomersetDee

Postby SomersetDee » replying to mariobarba » Mar 25, 2019, 6:27 pm

Ah! Thanks!