"Attack" in espresso tasting - Page 2

Discuss flavors, brew temperatures, blending, and cupping notes.
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cannonfodder
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#11: Post by cannonfodder »

I do not stir my espresso. In fact, I do not even own a demi spoon, never needed one. If I want a little sweet in my cappa, I add the sugar to the milk pre frothing. I may have to pick up a couple just to try out.
Dave Stephens

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another_jim (original poster)
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#12: Post by another_jim (original poster) »

timo888 wrote:An interesting thing to consider when noting the attack of an espresso is whether you stir your espresso with a spoon, or not. The brandy is pretty much uniform from top to bottom of the glass, whereas with unstirred espresso there can be quite distinct layers.
I never used to swirl, since my wonky pours did that for me ("I didn't know it was possible to get a jumping funnel pour with an M3" was the way Abe put it when he visited) :lol: Since my Titan upgrade, the pours are boringly steady. If I notice that the bottom is sweeter than the top, I'll give the shot a swirl after sipping off some crema. It does seem to happen. but I don't know enough about it yet to even speculate why.
Jim Schulman

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cannonfodder
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#13: Post by cannonfodder »

Could it be as simple as the sugar is heavier so it sinks to the bottom of the cup?

One of many products we supply is BIB soda syrup (Bag In Box). There is nearly 20 pounds difference between a classic Coke and diet Coke, no sugar (or high fructose corn syrup) in the diet product. The portion of the drink that contains most of the dissolved sugars may simply sink to the bottom of the cup.
Dave Stephens

treshell

#14: Post by treshell »

another_jim wrote:"Attack" is not a coffee tasting term, nor a wine one from which a lot of coffee tasting terminology is borrowed. It comes from from tasting brandies, whiskeys and other distilled drinks. Attack describes the intensity of the initial hit of the beverage on the tongue, which can vary a lot in these drinks. While it isn't very useful for describing regular coffees, I'm beginning to think it's absolutely huge for espresso.

Many people have remarked that brewed coffees are more like wine, while espresso is more like brandy. I think one of the key distinctions is in this initial attack.
I have been thinking about the above for a few days. For me the term speaks more to the Music within my coffee. If you saw me with my morning cup[ you would understand why to me it is pure music. I like the way the word is explained in 'Elson's Music Dictionary', copyright 1905.
Attaquer (Fr) or Attaccare (It)- To attack or commence the performance.
Attack- The method or clearness of beginning a phrase. The term is applied to solo or concerted music..
Attacco (It)- A short, decisive subject, or passage in fugal work.
Attastare (It)- To touch; to strike.

I find a lot of the terms of music speak to coffee tasting. You could get a bunch of new $100 dollar words to toss out to your friends by reading this book.

Or how about Melisma (Gr) A vocal grace or embellishment; several notes sung to one syllable.
Any way book is 306 pages long and I could use most of the words to talk about my coffee and how it makes me feel.

treshell who likes not to Fregiare her coffee with anything but half & half

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another_jim (original poster)
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#15: Post by another_jim (original poster) »

treshell wrote: I find a lot of the terms of music speak to coffee tasting. You could get a bunch of new $100 dollar words to toss out to your friends by reading this book.
I'll have to read it. I've been using "dinner and a show" cups to describe coffees that change in flavor as they cool down. Maybe I can find a more graceful term: sonata form cups?
Jim Schulman