Niseko, Kyoto, and Tokyo - Page 3

Talk about your favorite cafes, local barista events, or plan your own get-together.
Mike-R
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#21: Post by Mike-R »

MNate wrote:One we just happened upon that had a Slayer, great latte art, and blaring country music but it was a very dark roast and I almost didn't finish it.
If you don't mind me asking, which cafe was that?

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MNate
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#22: Post by MNate replying to Mike-R »

Streamer in Shibuya. They may have several locations. I ordered a Flat White and was asked single or double and I said double - a double shot I would have assumed but it ended up being huge. So idk... it really wasn't bad for a dark roast, lots of milk drink, but not what I like.


Mike-R
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#23: Post by Mike-R »

Thanks for replying. I was guessing that it was Streamers when you said Slayer and latte art. Haven't been there in probably 10 years, but used to enjoy it back in the day. It was one of the first 3rd wave cafes in the Shibuya area. Now there are many more, of course.

stump007
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#24: Post by stump007 »

LBIespresso wrote:I'm putting together an apple maps guide for my trip. Below is what I have so far. Sharing here for others to see and still looking for more. Cokuun is not on the map but I do plan on going.

image

I know I won't hit them all but I do have a ranking in my mind. But having a very long list makes it easier to find something close and good depending on where I am when the need for a good cup hits.
This is a great list! I'm quite curious how cokuun went, is it similar to Mameya Kakeru?

Also sharing this website which list many coffee shops in Japan (esp. smaller independent ones), https://goodcoffee.me/ it's quite a good list, and includes the type of brew as well as the equipment used by the stores :)

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LBIespresso (original poster)
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#25: Post by LBIespresso (original poster) replying to stump007 »

Oooo, thanks for that! Looks like a good resource!

I am going to Cokuun on Feb 11. I hear that Mameya is similar but I could only pick 1 so I went with Cokuun.
LMWDP #580

stump007
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#26: Post by stump007 »

For Mameya, you can still try the one in Omotensando. It's more central, and it's not a full-course setup. It's a standing coffee bar where you can try different beans (NB: from their partners as they aren't roasters), by the cup, it can be very quick or take more time as you like (technically Mameya Kakeru also has a small standing bar in the entrance but the venue is quite remote for most people).

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MNate
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#27: Post by MNate »

I never reported on what I learned on the last leg of my journey:

1. Cash is often the only option
2. They often expect you to sit and drink it there
3. A single shot is common

We ended our trip in Kyoto and did a lot of walking. Coffee shops were often in nice places to take a break so while I skipped them earlier in the trip, the last day in Kyoto I stopped at 3.

Lessons 1 & 2 came together at Tribute Coffee where the guy really only does pour over, so that's what I order. I was going to just grab it quick and go because my wife and daughter were across the street waiting in line for some very great onigiri (strongly recommend: https://maps.app.goo.gl/JVNdEp31Sd3BwaZ38?g_st=ic ), but they were quite insistent I sit down. So I ordered a scone for my son and a coffee for myself with milk and tried to drink it quickly but finally decided I should get going so I asked for a to-go cup. That's when I found out they only took cash (by this time in our trip I didn't have any) and they wouldn't let me change it to takeout (despite having cups for it). Anyway.. These two features seem to be fairly common because I started noticing when shops posted that take-out was ok, and well, I started being more careful to ask about credit first. (Bring cash to Japan!)
Tribute Coffee:


We ran across several Vermillion coffee shops and I finally tried one. They were pretty ok if you need a break. Also this AG shop. I was learning at this time that drinks come with a single shot of espresso and they did the deal where they just caught one of the two streams of espresso and dumped the other. Once I was asked if I wanted a double and what I got was, I think, twice the milk along with a double shot (that was at Steamers in Tokyo). Anyway, a bit of clarity in ordering is probably key to get what you want. Despite being mainly darker roasts I think they tend to be mild enough that too much milk drowns them out. Both were ok with takeout.




Finally, I knew there were some Blue Bottles around and stumbled on one at a good time for a break. Super nice place. I ordered a macchiato (thinking I'd learned my lesson from above), and it turned out to be super sour. Oh well. Barista error on lighter roasts is one advantage of the fool proof darker roasts!



I must say this walk from the Silver Pavilion down the Philosopher's walk and all the way down to Kiyomizu-dera was a highlight and all these coffee shops along the way were great relaxing spots, often with nice views. Made for a memorable day even if the coffee wasn't memorable.

So for me the Glitch Coffee was the only one I actually liked and it was super outstanding. I'm sure there are others that would be good. And I do think, even like places in America, if I figured out what exactly to order I'd like it better (seriously, half the time I go to a local very good place here in Minneapolis I order not quite right and it's not great).

SutterMill
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#28: Post by SutterMill »

Appreciate these tips. Just confirmed plans for Kyoto and Tokyo this summer. Its our first trip to Asia so I'm trying to absorb as much info as possible. Keep them coming.

stump007
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#29: Post by stump007 »

Generally speaking, it's best to always carry some cash in Japan. Nowadays most places allow credit/digital payment, but this is quite recent. Small cafes (and ramen places, mom and pop stores etc) may accept cash only, or an app called Paypay - but I'm not sure if paypay accepts foreign credit cards. :?

Points 2 and 3 are similar in most of the world really :D I think North America is the exception :wink:

Mike-R
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#30: Post by Mike-R »

stump007 wrote:Generally speaking, it's best to always carry some cash in Japan. Nowadays most places allow credit/digital payment, but this is quite recent. Small cafes (and ramen places, mom and pop stores etc) may accept cash only, or an app called Paypay - but I'm not sure if paypay accepts foreign credit cards. :?
And to add to this... the credit card machines at some of the older shops may not accept foreign cards. It can be very confusing for both the shop staff and the customer because the machine clearly says that it accepts MC and Visa cards, but unknown to everyone it only accepts MC and Visa cards that were issued in Japan.

So if you run short of cash and need to eat, be aware that the older restaurants may not accept your foreign card.