Using a lazy susan with pourover - Page 2

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
jbviau
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#11: Post by jbviau »

Is this mostly for cone brewers/V60? I brew with a Kalita 155, and I have no trouble getting a flat bed. I do a quick stir, easily repeatable, after the first pour, and that's it.

p.s. It's really more of a not-so-lazy Susan technique. Extra Susan? :lol:
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MikeTheBlueCow

#12: Post by MikeTheBlueCow »

I've been doing this a long time. What it does is moved the brewer around the water, and the "friction" of the water against the filter cleans it off without too much agitation. But what I do doesn't involve a lazy Susan, I just pick up the cone with both hands and roll it back and forth between them. I got this from Orange Cactus Coffee's video podcasts on YouTube. The difference between this and the lazy Susan is I wonder if the scale is going to be affected at all by spinning it back and forth rapidly frequently, but I guess certain brewers I wouldn't pick up with my hands during brewing,

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DamianWarS (original poster)
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#13: Post by DamianWarS (original poster) »

Jonk wrote:I've seen electric ones used to make the circular pour more repeatable, which looks a bit ridiculous but is it really making things more complicated? I think not.

I think the idea with the manual shake is when you don't want too much agitation. Looks neat and a lot easier than swirling a heavy decanter or for example porcelain dripper.
that's a good point, some brewers feel a little awkward doing a swirl like brewers that sit inside the cup and don't have a rim to sit on the cup. you have to lift the brewer out, swirl, then place it back in. It's not complicated but it can be awkward. I'm thinking of the plastic brewer in the Hario decantor and others like the origami. I think I've talked myself out of an automated one as it seems wasteful but if I get can find a nice wooden small one for a decent price I'll probably buy it.

DamianWarS (original poster)
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#14: Post by DamianWarS (original poster) »

jbviau wrote:Is this mostly for cone brewers/V60? I brew with a Kalita 155, and I have no trouble getting a flat bed. I do a quick stir, easily repeatable, after the first pour, and that's it.

p.s. It's really more of a not-so-lazy Susan technique. Extra Susan? :lol:
my understanding is increased consistency if you swirl the brewer (if you don't then it doesn't matter). the swirling also does more than promote a flatbed and it agitates as well. I'd like to see more data to support its potential benefits (if any)

DamianWarS (original poster)
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#15: Post by DamianWarS (original poster) »

so I found a little one that's for cookie decorating. A link to the same product in Amazon is here. I'm in Indonesia so not everything is available to me but some things that are, are super cheap. I can get this for about $3 USD. It has a 12cm diameter (4.7in) and at first, I didn't want to get one too big, now I'm hoping this one is big enough. Just curious for those who do use one how big yours is or what do you think the practical size limit is? I certainly don't want a 10in one. I didn't want the scale to take over the space too much, but I guess with this lightweight little one it could go on top of the scale. There is a slightly bigger one (similar product here) but I can only find it in pink and it's a bit of a deal-breaker but I can actually get it cheaper.

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mkane
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#16: Post by mkane »

DamianWarS wrote:It's a fair point, the more complicated you made the steps it will be harder to repeat and if the differences are very small it's probably better to keep it simple and on an average you will get more uniform results. However introducing the lazy Susan as per the video doesn't seem to over complicate it, it's just a method to spin to agitate (aka Rao spin) and to it's credit it's probably fairly consistent (I'm just sure how effective it is at agitating)

Not to diss any ones preferred method of po. We have different makes of filter, 4 different brands of holders, all ceramic+ Mellow dripper. I can't keep tract what we have now.

I quit timing draw down and try and focus on grind size and the after effects.

Brien

#17: Post by Brien »

DamianWarS wrote:that's a good point, some brewers feel a little awkward doing a swirl like brewers that sit inside the cup and don't have a rim to sit on the cup. you have to lift the brewer out, swirl, then place it back in. It's not complicated but it can be awkward. I'm thinking of the plastic brewer in the Hario decantor and others like the origami. I think I've talked myself out of an automated one as it seems wasteful but if I get can find a nice wooden small one for a decent price I'll probably buy it.
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Ejquin

#18: Post by Ejquin »

I use this one. It's size works well with an Acaia Pearl S

SAMYO Heavy Duty 360°Rotating Swivel Steel Ball Bearings Stand for Big Screen Tv Monitor/Turntable/Lazy Susan (10 Inches) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NBIHJ02/re ... ZTWHCnwGjR

DamianWarS (original poster)
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#19: Post by DamianWarS (original poster) » replying to Ejquin »

hmm... I was trying to avoid 10 inches but that's useful to know it works for you. I can also get that same model locally and cheaper so I might give it a try.

Ejquin

#20: Post by Ejquin »

Yeah, you want enough room to be able get your hands on either side of the scale. Maybe could get away with smaller though.