Unusual and Different Moka Pots - Page 3

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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IamOiman

#21: Post by IamOiman » May 22, 2019, 9:12 am

C-Antonio wrote: dont call it a Robin Hood moka... Alpini dont like to hear that about their hat... :D
shhh è un soprannome, anche mia mamma si chiamava Robin Hood :D .
-Ryan
I'll throw my portafilter in the ring
LMWDP #612

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C-Antonio

#22: Post by C-Antonio » replying to IamOiman » May 22, 2019, 2:37 pm

strano soprannome da dare alla mamma... :D
“Eh sì sì sì…sembra facile (fare un buon caffè)!”

BariManilow

#23: Post by BariManilow » Sep 11, 2019, 11:24 am

Hello everyone!
I am brand new to this site, having found it in my search for more information on a moka pot I just purchased yesterday on eBay US.

I am also brand new to moka pots, having just discovered that they make a nice, strong, full-flavored cup, after getting an opportunity to use one at a friend's house while staying there for several days. I was so impressed with the results, I decided to start looking for one of my own.

After looking at many different options online, I ran across this very unusual model, and was immediately intrigued!
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It looks to be made of copper clad with an aluminum skin, which is unlike any other moka pot I've seen so far. I assume that the brand name is "Vampa", but an internet search turned up almost no information, and few other examples. I was hoping that someone here might have some more information. I did find an estimated vintage of 1920-1949 on a similar Vampa moka, but no information as to how those dates were determined.

One thing I noticed after purchasing the unit is that it has no safety valve. Is that something that I should worry about? I'd hate to think that these are vanishingly rare because they have all exploded :shock: . I will most likely be using it with a larger grind for a more traditional coffee, rather than trying for an espresso-like result, but would appreciate any advice as to how to avoid accidentally turning this thing into a bomb on my stove.

Cheers,
Dave

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C-Antonio

#24: Post by C-Antonio » Sep 12, 2019, 9:01 am

BariManilow wrote: It looks to be made of copper clad with an aluminum skin, which is unlike any other moka pot I've seen so far. I assume that the brand name is "Vampa", but an internet search turned up almost no information, and few other examples. I was hoping that someone here might have some more information. I did find an estimated vintage of 1920-1949 on a similar Vampa moka, but no information as to how those dates were determined.

One thing I noticed after purchasing the unit is that it has no safety valve. Is that something that I should worry about? I'd hate to think that these are vanishingly rare because they have all exploded :shock: . I will most likely be using it with a larger grind for a more traditional coffee, rather than trying for an espresso-like result, but would appreciate any advice as to how to avoid accidentally turning this thing into a bomb on my stove.

Cheers,
Dave
You have to think that the moka was patented in 1933 by Bialetti so it cant be from the 20s... The Vampa brand is of two brothers, Antonio and Giuseppe Sottini. Like many other companies in the metal fabrication business they were manufacturing parts for several industries (like stuff for Fiat for example), and things like coffeemakers were just one of their products, (an "on the side" was very common). They started with coffeemakers using the Vampa brand in the 1950s, Im not sure how common they were but you see them around.
They quickly shifted onto brassware and became big with bathroom parts etc. I dont think they went past the 60s with the mokas.
The company still exist, still bathroom parts and accessories I think, search for Sottini and you might find something more about the moka pot.
I dont know if there is something inherent in the design that would make a safety valve not necessary: look at the bottom of that basket, the filter part with the long pin, there is a sleeve attached to the filter and then the pin, try to see if the middle pin is completely fixed in that aluminum sleeve or if it moves.

Btw in your pictures I cant see if its missing the gasket or if the top filter is sitting above the gasket.
“Eh sì sì sì…sembra facile (fare un buon caffè)!”

BariManilow

#25: Post by BariManilow » Sep 12, 2019, 10:57 am

Thanks for the information! You seem to be much better informed than the "expert" who gave the first date range (unless she has secret knowledge regarding some time-traveling metallurgist brothers from Italy that we are not privy to). :lol: (this is information I found on another site when researching my purchase)
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All I have right now is the auction photos, as the pot is being shipped to me, so your guess is as good as mine regarding the gasket. My guess, from looking at the first picture, is that there is a badly worn gasket on the wrong side of the top screen. When buying the pot, I made a gamble on being able to find or modify a gasket to fit it; there are so few examples online, I didn't expect to find anyone making gaskets for this brand anymore.
I will post some more information when I have it in hand.

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drgary
Team HB

#26: Post by drgary » Sep 12, 2019, 11:58 am

The most qualified expert of caffetieres I know is Lucio Del Piccolo. He is also a member here, aka LVX. Here is Lucio's blog.
Gary
LMWDP#308

What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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yakster
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#27: Post by yakster » Sep 12, 2019, 8:36 pm

C-Antonio wrote:You have to think that the moka was patented in 1933 by Bialetti so it cant be from the 20s... The Vampa brand is of two brothers, Antonio and Giuseppe Sottini.... They started with coffeemakers using the Vampa brand in the 1950s, Im not sure how common they were but you see them around.
This lead me to this site https://www.specifysottini.co.uk/about- ... story.html
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

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C-Antonio

#28: Post by C-Antonio » Sep 13, 2019, 4:39 am

yakster wrote:This lead me to this site https://www.specifysottini.co.uk/about- ... story.html
Yep, it does summarizes it nicely.

Its wasnt uncommon for those kind of companies to veer into other markets, I came across more than a few unknown brands, in some cases it was stuff from companies very local to me, very limited production, impossible to find any info on them... some good and some bad but cheap to buy and fun to try...
BariManilow wrote:(this is information I found on another site when researching my purchase)
Ah catawiki... well, they are what they are...
“Eh sì sì sì…sembra facile (fare un buon caffè)!”