Turkish coffee without ibrik

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Acavia

#1: Post by Acavia »

I mainly brew and drink V60 ~24g of coffee. I want to try Turkish coffee as a change of pace coffee, but I have never had it and therefore would rather not buy an ibrik in case I do not care for it. To check if I like it: How close to ibrik brewed Turkish coffee would brewing Turkish coffee in a sauce pan be - close enough to be representative? Any recipes?

Jeff
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#2: Post by Jeff »

Though I haven't brewed Turkish in decades, I learned a lot finding https://www.specialtyturkishcoffee.com/ ... rinciples/

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Chert
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#3: Post by Chert »

Maybe a 12 or 8oz frothing pitcher could make a substitute cezve.
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ytm

#4: Post by ytm »

I think you can also simply brew it in a peheated cup, temp should be stable enough to extract it properly, up to a certain ratio (didn't measure it).

Regarding recipes, I don't really have something accurate as an espresso/v60 recipe, but I can provide some tips, some of them come from a local roaster:
Water should be at 90-92c, though I suppose it should be taken with a grain of salt as it's specific to the roast levels he's using.

Ratio should be far more conentrated than v60, I like using 1:3 volume ratio, I mostly made turkish when I was at work (Those far away days, when I didn't WFH all week), so I didn't really measure it by weight. In any case, simply go by taste, but I think that's not a bad starting point that will place you close to it.

Regarding the process itself, it's pretty straightforward:
Pre heat the cup, add coffee, pour water at a fitting temp to your beans' roast level and desired ratio, stir, wait for it to cool (I like to let it cool to the same temp in which I drink v60), stir again, wait for the ground coffee to fall to the bottom, and enjoy your coffee.

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baldheadracing
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#5: Post by baldheadracing »

Acavia wrote:I mainly brew and drink V60 ~24g of coffee. I want to try Turkish coffee as a change of pace coffee, but I have never had it and therefore would rather not buy an ibrik in case I do not care for it. To check if I like it: How close to ibrik brewed Turkish coffee would brewing Turkish coffee in a sauce pan be - close enough to be representative? Any recipes?
Standard recipe is 70g/l - so 7g coffee to 100g cold water for a typical Turkish cup.

I'd say a saucepan would be too wide - something like the frothing pitcher shown above would work well. Ibriks do neck down to concentrate the foam, so something that also necks down would be ideal.

There is some debate over how many times one "foams" the coffee (bringing the coffee almost to boiling so a head of foam forms and rises in the brewing vessel, and then removing from heat so the head dies down). Depending on tradition, once, twice, or three times is recommended. (No foam is a different prep method - cowboy coffee, kokekaffe ...)

There is also some debate over whether sugar is added to the water before brewing. I prefer dissolving brown sugar in the water before brewing. The traditional 'method' is not to add sugar, but to serve the coffee with Lokum (a.k.a. Turkish Delight candy). Unfortunately, great Lokum can be hard to find, as it is at its best right after it is made.

As an aside, if you find that you enjoy Turkish, then I've found that Turkish is a prep method where a fully-automatic machine will brew very well - better than my efforts with an ibrik for sure. I have a Beko, but there are others. Here's a review of the Beko by @Randy G.: http://www.espressomyespresso.com/beko.html
What I'm interested in is my worst espresso being fantastic - James Hoffmann

DamianWarS

#6: Post by DamianWarS »

Acavia wrote:I mainly brew and drink V60 ~24g of coffee. I want to try Turkish coffee as a change of pace coffee, but I have never had it and therefore would rather not buy an ibrik in case I do not care for it. To check if I like it: How close to ibrik brewed Turkish coffee would brewing Turkish coffee in a sauce pan be - close enough to be representative? Any recipes?
an ibrik is a larger vessel for hot beverages with a long spout more like a traditional coffee pot. What you mean is a cezve. they are meant for smaller doses but you can use a saucepan you would have to dose up a little because saucepans are larger. a milk frothing picture could work but its handle would get too hot so you would have to figure some other way to hold it. a cezve should be fairly inexpensive, I would just fine a cheap one and pick it up if you want to get into Turkish coffee.

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drgary
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#7: Post by drgary »

I found this method worked immediately. This is how I brew coffee right out of the roaster to see if my roast was successful. I've found it very helpful to have the upper part tapered.

How to prepare Turkish coffee
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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Rustic39

#8: Post by Rustic39 »

I'm going through basically the same transition as the OP. I recently was fortunate though to be able to "eat-in" for lunch at a Turkish restaurant. My daughters and I all had a serving of Turkish coffees. Without being asked if I wanted it, the coffees were prepared with sugar (light). We optionally could have asked for medium or xtra sugar apparently, I found out later. I was good with the "light" sugar version.

In addition to a prep method, the grind is also much finer than even espresso. Seemed more like talcum powder than coffee grinds. I'm assuming this permits the coffee to dissolve more or be more suspended in the water?

The coffees were served in doppio sized straight walled cups, with a small amount of foam floating in top. After drinking down to the bottom, we had a significant amount of mud on the bottom.

The recipes I have seen and tried are basically.....
For a doppio size serving:
1. Two teaspoons of Turkish grinds into pot
2. Sugar amount of choice, with a half teaspoon being what I was served.
3. One measure of room temp water of same volume as serving cup, poured into pot with coffee grinds and sugar.
4. Now mix well, then put over medium heat.
5. Watch and allow the coffee to heat slowly but not come a a rolling boil. Allow foam to form, and spoon off as available to be put into cup.
6. When satisfied coffee has simmered a bit to desired degree, pour slowly into serving cup.
7. Let stand a bit so residual coffee grinds settle in cup, then ready to drink.

I also do not yet have the correct pot for this style, so I haven't been very successful getting a good foam. I tried making this in a Japanese cast iron tea pot, with home roasted Yemeni coffee that I ground on the finest setting my grinder can do. The resultant grind was too fine for espresso, but I think a bit coarse yet for Turkish.

In any case, my results were good enough that I've moved forward with purchasing a correct pot, and am seriously considering a Turkish hand coffee grinder next.
Good luck Op.

ytm

#9: Post by ytm »

I for one really prefer the taste without sugar, as I think it masks a lot of the flavor.

Also, when I do brew with an Ibrik, I seem to get better results when only boiling the water, letting them cool for a few seconds after removing from the heat source, adding the coffee, stirring thoroughly, and then returning to the heat source. I didn't really do a thorough comparison between this and heating together with the coffee from the start, as I only use an Ibrik on hiking trips, but that is my experience so far.

Regarding when to stop the heating, assuming that dark roasted beans are used for Turkish, I think it's best to stop at the first hint of foam expansion.

BTW, most electric grinders are no good for Turkish, better use a manual.

Rustic39

#10: Post by Rustic39 »

Ytm, do you have a preference for brand of Turkish coffee mill? I'm researching now, and am leaning towards a copper straight wall unit of the traditional tried and true design. One of the Turkish companies.

Also, at what point in the heat up do you expect to see satisfactory foam up? Do you allow a boil to start?