Syphon temperatures

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
DamianWarS

#1: Post by DamianWarS »

I've had a syphon for a little but I found coffee to come out a little harsh and I haven't used it for a while. That was until I got a very light roast and I thought a coffee like this would pair well with the syphon as it brews at near-boiling temps. While I was setting it up I put a digital thermometer just to track the changes of the brew water and to my surprise the highest it went was 90c but usually it stayed around 88c, 89c. I enjoyed the light roast in the syphon and I have been grinding finer and finer each time. Right now I'm at the edge of filter and any more finer and it would be in the espresso range but it hasn't gotten astringent yet. but my initial reasons for the coffee being harsh seems to not be based on high temps as the temp of the top was never really going that high. I brew it over a gas range so the flame/height would be consistent as it was before (although I never checked the temp before) the flame is actually got quite a bit of space between it and the syphon so I'm thinking this is why the temp is a little lower at the top but I was surprised by the results that the water was this temp to begin with. What are typical temps of the water at the top of a syphon? does it reach near boiling if the bottom has more aggressive heat?

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TomC
Team HB

#2: Post by TomC »

I use a Thermopro Thermopop for measuring the temp of my siphon brewer. Starting with boiling water from my gooseneck, and the lamp maxed out, I usually see about 93ºC. A few times I'd let it go for like 5 minutes before tossing in the coffee and I could get it a bit higher, but it takes a ton of heat to get it anywhere near 100ºC.

Grinding finer and agitation is my go-to method.


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yakster
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#3: Post by yakster »

You can influence the temperature by when you mount the funnel to the base. When you mount the funnel to the base when you just start to see water vapor bubbling up through the water (which appears well before boiling temps are reached) then you'll have a cooler temp in the funnel. The later you wait, the higher temps you should see. You can also use the lid to help retain heat, if you desire.

I let the water rise up into the funnel fully before adding the coffee and I usually allow two minutes immersion time for 5 - 8 cups of coffee in my Yama 8 before removing the siphon from the heat to start the draw-down. I know that one minute immersion time is common with smaller siphons, you should be able to influence the astringency based both on temp and immersion time.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

jpender

#4: Post by jpender »

yakster wrote:You can influence the temperature by when you mount the funnel to the base. When you mount the funnel to the base when you just start to see water vapor bubbling up through the water (which appears well before boiling temps are reached) then you'll have a cooler temp in the funnel. The later you wait, the higher temps you should see.

That's not water vapor, at least not mainly. The early bubbles when heating water are due to dissolved gases coming out of solution, mostly CO2.

Whatever. The physics of syphon/vac pots is similar to moka pots in that the presence of air in the boiling chamber lowers the temperature for a given pressure. The sooner you mount the funnel the more air will remain and that air adds pressure. Lacking that air the water has to be hotter to attain the same pressure. That's it in a nutshell; not to say that this explains how to make a good brew.

DamianWarS

#5: Post by DamianWarS »

TomC wrote:I use a Thermopro Thermopop for measuring the temp of my siphon brewer. Starting with boiling water from my gooseneck, and the lamp maxed out, I usually see about 93ºC. A few times I'd let it go for like 5 minutes before tossing in the coffee and I could get it a bit higher, but it takes a ton of heat to get it anywhere near 100ºC.

Grinding finer and agitation is my go-to method.

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so that counters my logic as to why there's a harsher taste or why a lighter roast would be better. I always thought it was bear boiling like cowboy coffee that gets filtered but if the temps are about 93ºC then this seems the ideal temp for coffee. I add coffee after the water has risen to the funnel, stir it pretty good and turn off the heat at about 1:45-2:00. I do another stir when I turn off the heat, ratio is 20g/300ml. any ideas for a new method or things to tweak?

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mkane
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#6: Post by mkane »

Thanks for the memories. It's been so long since we have used this I wouldn't know where to start.