Starbucks moving from batch brew to single servings using new tech

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Milligan

#1: Post by Milligan »

https://www.reuters.com/business/retail ... 022-09-13/

Sorry if this is not the right forum for this but I found this particular piece interesting:
Another machine, which brews hot coffee one cup at a time instead of in bulk batches and eliminates paper filters, is being tested in Minneapolis locations and could be rolled out broadly next year.
Starbucks seems to have capacity issues and is trying to develop new technology to speed up the process while retaining "quality." I'm curious to see how this manifests. Single serving without a paper filter does seem like an odd way to go for maximizing speed. I'd think batch brew is well suited for speed since they seem to not have an issue with demand and would use the coffee quickly. Perhaps it reduces the cleaning time it takes with a large serving pot and filter basket. Removing a paper filter may seem like a small expense to home users but extrapolate that over all the cafes and that is likely millions in savings.

Anyway, curious to see if this is a technology that may trickle down to the home user. I was actually surprised that they still offer pour overs with the kind of line that is usually wrapped around those locations.



Anyone in the Minneapolis area want to be taste tester? :D

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EvanOz85

#2: Post by EvanOz85 »

This machine looks and sounds similar to the grind and brew machines at certain gas stations (Race Trac, Circle K). They basically brew large caffè cremas (espresso with a crap-ton of water run through the puck). I've never had a very decent coffee from one of them.

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slybarman

#3: Post by slybarman »

i read it to mean this was for drip coffee, not espresso.

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EvanOz85

#4: Post by EvanOz85 » replying to slybarman »

They brew "drip style" coffee, but its basically made the same way as a very long espresso. That is, if these new Starbucks thingys are what I think they are. And I'm pretty sure they are.

These are the gas station machines I'm talking about:


Acavia

#5: Post by Acavia »

What are those black things in the hopper?

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EvanOz85

#6: Post by EvanOz85 » replying to Acavia »

A light roast, by Starbucks' standards.

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luca
Team HB

#7: Post by luca »

I wonder if the point here is to brand it as a more premium drink because it is brewed by the cup, to increase the price? Regardless of quality.
LMWDP #034 | 2011: Q Exam, WBrC #3, Aus Cup Tasting #1 | Insta: @lucacoffeenotes

Mbb

#8: Post by Mbb »

Their coffee's already nasty what difference does it make.
It's only popular cuz people put milk whipped cream and caramel and sprinkles in it

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another_jim
Team HB

#9: Post by another_jim »

Does anyone remember the name of the single cup brewer from the mid aughts that was bought out by Starbucks, then ditched? It got great reviews when it was first used for overpriced cups in specialty shops, although I thought it produced completely flat tasting coffee. In any case, Starbucks has been trying to get some juice in their brewed coffee volume and income for a long time now.
Jim Schulman

Alwayzbakin

#10: Post by Alwayzbakin »

Clover