Stanley pour over dripper

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
DanN

#1: Post by DanN »

I am a lover of Stanley products . Looks like it's neither a flat bottom nor cone shaped .It has a permanent stainless cylindrical filter on the inside. One of my friend tried it and said that though the filter was porous, drip rate was very slow. He said the coffee was good , but could have been better. Just was wondering if any one has tried this product ?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B088J ... =UTF8&th=1

DamianWarS

#2: Post by DamianWarS » replying to DanN »

it would pair well with a classic Stanley thermos that's for sure. I think it would be an excellent brewer for a camping or outdoor application but perhaps not for a daily driver. I would feel perfectly fine throwing that in with the rest of the camping equipment (or dropping it off the side of a cliff) knowing it's going to come out the same.

DanN

#3: Post by DanN »

It's an outdoor product for sure as it's built like a tank ...But wanted to see if can do well indoors and compete with our Kalitas and Melittas .

Fluffeepuff
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#4: Post by Fluffeepuff »

Bookmarked hoping folks chime in with their experience - this looks like a handy/rugged travel option for brewing.
<*>---<

DanN

#5: Post by DanN »

I got this dripper , but was not good . The only good thing is the good stainless body, but the cheap mesh filter is not good. Regardless of the grind size I used, coffee does not drain as expected. Very poor drip rate....it just drips. Coffee grounds just clog the filter at the bottom . I don't mind grinds in my cup and like metal filtered coffee. but this produced a very mediocre brew. There are ton of better options at this price point and went it comes to back packing it's a bit bulky also. I donated it to my neighborhood Goodwill store.

DamianWarS

#6: Post by DamianWarS » replying to DanN »

It probably needs a coarse grind. You should try it with a paper filter and see if that improved the flow.

DanN

#7: Post by DanN »

I tried coarse grind also ....thing is I even removed the cylindrical mesh filter that came with it and used it with a regular basket paper filter and did not like it. Wish it was designed a bit better ...

Jeff

#8: Post by Jeff »

If you're going to use paper filters, might as well go with a cheaper, lighter, and more robust plastic V60 or similar of your choice. Even with a bottle of green, hammertone paint, you're under the US$20 for the Stanley.

Ullke

#9: Post by Ullke »

I use my Stanley Thermos a lot, and the v60 03 fits perfectly on top. So perfect in fact, that you need to drill hole(s) in it for the air to escape without making a mess.

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baldheadracing
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#10: Post by baldheadracing »

DanN wrote:I tried coarse grind also ....thing is I even removed the cylindrical mesh filter that came with it and used it with a regular basket paper filter and did not like it. Wish it was designed a bit better ...
It might have been designed to be used with pre-ground (pre-packaged) coffee. Commercial roller grinders produce almost no fines. Somewhere, I have a collapsible camp coffee maker from GSI or MSR which did a fine Melitta-style drip-brew with pre-ground, but was unpredictable with the small conical-burr hand grinders that I used to take camping.

I'm not sure why, but camping companies just do not seem to make good coffee makers. Thankfully we have the Aeropress now.
What I'm interested in is my worst espresso being fantastic - James Hoffmann