Pour over makers -- is there really a difference? - Page 2

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
chockfullofbutts (original poster)

#11: Post by chockfullofbutts (original poster) »

2:15 is MUCH shorter than anything I do. Does that include a 30 second break for the coffee to bloom?

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GC7
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#12: Post by GC7 »

When I have to make a single serving brewed coffee I have always used a clever dripper that I bought as soon as Sweet Maria's put them up for sale long ago. I have been thrilled with the results so I have never really been curious to try pour over. Most of what I drink is SO espresso.

Can someone compare the cup from a clever dripper where I use immersion for 3 1/2 minutes before drawdown with any of these pour over contraptions. I imagine the clever yields a fuller bodied and perhaps less nuanced cup but someone must have more than my speculation.

Thanks.

coffeeOnTheBrain

#13: Post by coffeeOnTheBrain » replying to GC7 »

I never used a clever dripper but it should be similar to the Hario Switch. My recipe for the switch is done in 2:30 or less though. Anyway, the comparison I posted above should be roughly equivalent maybe even a little more extreme in the difference given your recipe.

PS: maybe try Hoffmann's Switch recipe with the clever, the most important part is adding the grounds after the water for a quicker draw down. This approach should take you closer to the cups you would get with a pour over, so you can decide if you like the direction.

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GC7
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#14: Post by GC7 » replying to coffeeOnTheBrain »

Thanks for that information. I'm so focused on my espresso I never heard of the Switch. I'll check out Hoffmann's recipe. Adding coffee to the water makes sense. On the rare occasions that I use my vacuum brewers I do that once the water rises to the top chamber and reaches the target temperature. It's a game changer for that brew method.

ira
Team HB

#15: Post by ira »

chockfullofbutts wrote:Thanks, Jeff. Not sure that I mentioned anywhere in my original message that I prefer Dunkin' Donuts, Tim Horton's, or any other inexpensive pre-ground coffee.
Some coffee's are much more sensitive to how you brew that, not sure that there is anything you can do to any of those three choices that will make a huge difference. Since you neglected to mention how you currently brew them and what options you have to experiment with, it is hard to suggest what you might do that would improve your experience of your preferred coffee's.

coffeeOnTheBrain

#16: Post by coffeeOnTheBrain »

GC7 wrote:Thanks for that information. I'm so focused on my espresso I never heard of the Switch. I'll check out Hoffmann's recipe. Adding coffee to the water makes sense. On the rare occasions that I use my vacuum brewers I do that once the water rises to the top chamber and reaches the target temperature. It's a game changer for that brew method.
You are welcome :)
I realized that my description "Hoffmann's Switch recipe" is misleading as he has a video about the switch that doesn't explain the recipe I refer to.
This video does though, it is just hard to find as it is on another channel:

ira
Team HB

#17: Post by ira »

The Switch, the Clever and the valved brewer that Bonavita makes will likely all give similar results. They are all valved brewers with some sort of cone filter. I've used the Bonavita and both plastic and glass Clever brewers with similar results. The Switch might be an improvement if it drains faster.

rmongiovi

#18: Post by rmongiovi »

I use the Bonavita or the Clever and I have to say that I've tried Hoffman's "add the water first and then the coffee" and apparently I'm a total nincompoop. All it does for me is make more of a mess since pouring water on coffee help rinse the grounds into the water. I see no improvement in draw down time (or if there is it's within the variability of draw down that I experience normally).

I'm a big fan of immersion both from the standpoint of the goal of getting coffee dissolved into water and from its simplicity and forgiving nature. But beyond that I wonder if he's just overthinking it.

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yakster
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#19: Post by yakster »

rmongiovi wrote:I use the Bonavita or the Clever and I have to say that I've tried Hoffman's "add the water first and then the coffee" and apparently I'm a total nincompoop. All it does for me is make more of a mess since pouring water on coffee help rinse the grounds into the water. I see no improvement in draw down time (or if there is it's within the variability of draw down that I experience normally).
Your grind quality may not cause filter clogging that the trick of adding water first may help to prevent, so you probably won't see much benefit.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

ojt

#20: Post by ojt »

chockfullofbutts wrote:2:15 is MUCH shorter than anything I do. Does that include a 30 second break for the coffee to bloom?
Yes. My normal brew times with the Origami, including bloom etc, are 2:15 to 2:30. It depends a lot on the coffee of course but I find my brews very well extracted at least to my taste. I don't measure TDS at all though so take what I say with a pinch of salt. With that said, I haven't found most professionally brewed cups that much better than mine, and if they are they were usually done with very expensive high quality beans.

Lots of variables at play here including the beans, the roast, water and its temperature, technique / recipe, the brewer, personal taste, etc. I do in fact find the initial hurdle of dialing in the pour over routine harder than dialing in a decent espresso :) Personally I think it took me two years to get to a pretty good standard. I did enjoy the results in the meanwhile but looking back I was probably mostly under extracting, and often brewing with too hot water. It did probably help to only have one brewer. Maybe during the next couple of years I am ready to take on a new one :)
Osku