Near espresso recipe for Aeropress - Page 5

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Jonk

#41: Post by Jonk »

Espresso grind, but on the coarse side. Mostly because I think it tastes better that way, it's easy enough to press it.

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BuzzedLightyear (original poster)

#42: Post by BuzzedLightyear (original poster) »

jpender wrote:
I guess it begs the question: Why?

Is it because someone can't afford an espresso machine? A Flair Classic costs less than $200, the price of about 8lbs of roasted coffee. So that can't be it. So is it for travel? A stock Aeropress can make a pretty darn good cup. Is it really worth it to go through all the machinations in your hotel room or whatever for a pseudo espresso instead? If you need an espresso that badly why not get a Flair Classic. They're designed for travel.

Maybe it's just because we can.
I own and use a Flair espresso machine often. But it's an involved process that sometimes requires you to start over when one of the variables goes wrong. Such as poor distribution, wrong grind size, etc...

In addition, when I have guests. Most never ask for an espresso. Rather, they want a cappuccino or the like. The flair would take forever serving four people. If your lucky enough to consistently pull four shots in reasonable time, that's great! But, they often go unappreciated after being drowned in Milk. Where you can make a better then "Moka Pot like espresso" fairly quickly and consistently. That is way more forgiving and faster then the flair.

Plus during the work week I can make an espresso like drink or cappuccino very quickly with an Aeropress with little set up time or clean up time. When I'm traveling it's much more compact and lighter to carry a Aeropress with my Izpresso Q2 grinder inside the plunger. Then carrying around the giant flair
case.


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jpender

#43: Post by jpender »

Using it to make a larger batch of concentrated coffee for milk drinks or for people who just want good coffee (as opposed to espresso) -- that makes a lot of sense. It would take me at least 15 minutes, probably closer to 20, to pull 4 double shots with my Robot. But for straight shots or Americanos I really notice the difference between espresso and Aeropress or moka. I can take the Robot out of it's cupboard, pull a shot, and clean up in just a few minutes more than it takes with an Aeropress. It's actually faster than using my moka pot.

For travel the Aeropress is king, especially paired with a grinder like you have. What grinder is that?

Jonk

#44: Post by Jonk »

https://1zpresso.coffee/q/

There's also the aergrind:
..although I have owned one and can't really recommend it unless portability is much more important than flavor. I guess Knock is known for QC issues and poor support as well unfortunately.

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BuzzedLightyear (original poster)

#45: Post by BuzzedLightyear (original poster) »

jpender wrote:
For travel the Aeropress is king, especially paired with a grinder like you have. What grinder is that?

The Izpresso Q2. The build quality is amazing and outperforms much more expensive grinders. One of the best $99 I ever spent! However spend the extra $50 for the JX pro version if your going to do more espresso rather then Aeropress. It's faster and has more adjustments


jpender

#46: Post by jpender »

Thank you, that sounds great. I almost bought a Knock Aergrind but was really put off by the complete lack of communication from the company. I've been looking for something else for quite a while. This may be the ticket.

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BuzzedLightyear (original poster)

#47: Post by BuzzedLightyear (original poster) » replying to jpender »

You won't be disappointed. I get better grind consistency from this grinder then my Rancilio Rocky. Even more so with the JX model