Minimalist coffee brewing

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
User avatar
RapidCoffee
Team HB

#1: Post by RapidCoffee »

I picked up this interesting little coffee brewing device for about $2 at the Boulder Army Store near the Pearl Street Mall this summer, threw it in a drawer, and promptly forgot about it. It resurfaced this weekend and I gave it a try.

Image
Bare essentials: cup, hot water, filter sock with ground coffee, and skewer to suspend it in the cup.

Coffee brewing equipment doesn't get much simpler. I used 12.5g ground coffee to 200ml water (1:16 ratio), which maxes out the capacity of these little filters. The results are similar to pourover drip brewing using a paper filter.

Cons: Small capacity, due to filter size (limited to about 8oz of brew). Getting the coffee into the filter socks is a minor hassle, compared with standard filter cones.

Pros: Super minimalist coffee brewing. Ideal for travel, backpacking, etc. Very inexpensive. Good results, comparable to filter brew. Total immersion of grinds is possible towards the end of the pour.*

* In limited testing, this did not seem to improve matters.
John

User avatar
cafeIKE

#2: Post by cafeIKE »

Reminds me of Chorreador de cafe from Costa Rica

User avatar
RapidCoffee
Team HB

#3: Post by RapidCoffee »

Indeed. Or the Hario Dripper shown in this CG how-to. Unfortunately neither device appears to be commercially available in the US.
John

Ken Fox

#4: Post by Ken Fox »

So this is the real "jus de chaussette," as the French would say?

ken
:lol:
What, me worry?

Alfred E. Neuman, 1955

chang00

#5: Post by chang00 »

This is my chopsticks version of drip. In a pinch at a hotel, I guess a coffee stirrer will do. The cardboard paper single dripper was purchasead from Daiso in California. In Asia, this kind of disposable single drippers are more common:

Image
Image

User avatar
JohnB.
Supporter ♡

#6: Post by JohnB. »

RapidCoffee wrote:Indeed. Or the Hario Dripper shown in this CG how-to. Unfortunately neither device appears to be commercially available in the US.
I bought mine here: http://www.avenue18.ca/TEAPOT/Hario/cof ... _DPW_3.htm Raymond is great to deal with & usually has a good selection of Hario products.
LMWDP 267

User avatar
RapidCoffee
Team HB

#7: Post by RapidCoffee »

Ken Fox wrote:So this is the real "jus de chaussette," as the French would say?
Mais, bien sur. Ooh la la.
John

User avatar
yakster
Supporter ♡

#8: Post by yakster »

Cowboy coffee is about as basic as you can get, but I have been wanting to make Turkish coffee for a while and try out my new Ibrik.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

User avatar
SlowRain

#9: Post by SlowRain »

chang00 wrote:In Asia, this kind of disposable single drippers are more common:
People here have been using something similar for about two years now. The coffee is preground and placed in the filter. The filter gets sealed at the top and then placed into another package, along with one of those anti-oxidant things. The package is then sealed, which kind of makes it look like some sort of instant drink. The main difference between filters is the ones here have little paper tabs/ears that clip/fold over the sides of the cups--no need for a skewer or such.

They're fairly popular here for people who just want hassle-free one-cup brewing. The higher-end coffee shops have adopted this quite eagerly.

User avatar
alyce

#10: Post by alyce »

There has to be a downside! Teabags have been around for ages, if coffeebags are as good as filterbrew then why the heck isn't coffeebags more common, especially in supermarkets/home settings!?!?