Methods for high ratio (1:2 - 1:3) strong coffee without a machine

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Phobic

#1: Post by Phobic »

I'm toying with the idea of getting rid of my coffee machine, I drink far more brewed coffee than I do Espresso and the machine takes of a lot of space in the kitchen.

If I did the question is what options do I have to make high ratio 1:2 - 1:3 without a coffee machine? I don't want the ability to froth milk so that should make life easier.

I very much enjoy moka and the mouth feel it gives but I'm brewing at 1:15, not sure how high a moka could go.

I can't see immersion or filter being able to go that strong.

does the Prismo Attachment for AeroPress allow for very high ratios?

I've got an EK43 with new coffee burrs, not sure if it can get fine enough for a stove top turkish?

are there any other gadgets out there that work for high ratio? not sure I like the idea of a hand held espresso machine, concerned over the consistency that's achievable, but if there's a small enough solution that might be an option?

open to ideas!

DeGaulle

#2: Post by DeGaulle »

If your coffee machine is taking up too much space, what about the grinder?
How about a Cafelat Robot coupled with a really good manual grinder?
Bert

jpender

#3: Post by jpender »

You can make 1:3 coffee in an Aeropress, with or without a Prismo. But it's an inefficient way to make coffee because so much of the goods stay trapped as liquid in the grounds.

For a number of years I used a Bialetti Brikka, a modified moka pot. In one series of brews my coffee:beverage ratio averaged 1:3.7. I could have tweaked it to get 1:3. But just as with an espresso machine that can affect the results depending on the particular coffee and other parameters.

The Brikka has been redesigned (again) and I'm not sure if the new one works the same as my second generation model. People had a mix of opinions about the Brikka even back then. I found it worked really well for me but I'll never go back to it. Although I could make nice coffees with it espresso from my Robot is better.

And my Robot takes up *zero* countertop space as it fits easily in a cupboard, just like a Cuisinart. It weighs a lot less than our Cuisinart though.

User avatar
yakster
Supporter ♡

#4: Post by yakster »

I think a Robot or a Flair is a good solution for your needs. I agree that it takes zero counter space, my Robot is small enough that I keep it with my other coffee gear in the corner of the dining room and only bring it out when I want to pull a shot.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

Phobic (original poster)

#5: Post by Phobic (original poster) »

DeGaulle wrote:If your coffee machine is taking up too much space, what about the grinder?
How about a Cafelat Robot coupled with a really good manual grinder?
no plans to get rid of the grinder, grind quality for brewed is still very important for me.

A robot is defiantly an option though the footprint is a bit bigger than I'd like, in fact if I were to go for something like that I wonder if a small lever machine like a La Pavoni might be a better option.
jpender wrote:You can make 1:3 coffee in an Aeropress, with or without a Prismo. But it's an inefficient way to make coffee because so much of the goods stay trapped as liquid in the grounds.
not that worried about inefficiency here as it's an occasional thing, will have to read about 1:3 with an aeropress, I assume it's just a case of loading in lots of coffee and leaving it long enough to achieve equilibrium. I'd grind fairly fine, ~12 o'clock on the EK dial.
jpender wrote:For a number of years I used a Bialetti Brikka, a modified moka pot. In one series of brews my coffee:beverage ratio averaged 1:3.7. I could have tweaked it to get 1:3. But just as with an espresso machine that can affect the results depending on the particular coffee and other parameters.
that's really interesting, what mods did you do? were the mods specifically for high ratio?

Assume you were grinding near to espresso grind for the moka to get 1:3.7, did you need to do anything different like use filter papers top and bottom? I've tried moka's using Aeropress filters, this improves clarity at the loss of mouth feel, but wondering if you'd need to do this to stop all the grounds being pushed through.

I've got an Alessi moka and would think filter paper would be needed if grinding fine.

Phobic (original poster)

#6: Post by Phobic (original poster) »

yakster wrote:I think a Robot or a Flair is a good solution for your needs. I agree that it takes zero counter space, my Robot is small enough that I keep it with my other coffee gear in the corner of the dining room and only bring it out when I want to pull a shot.
Have been looking at the flair as well, James Hoffman has a useful video on it. Though it does make me wonder if I should try to find a very small footprint lever machine as an alternative

radioradio

#7: Post by radioradio »

I love my Flair although pour-over/immersion is my go-to method 99% of the time. The Flair is easily stowed in a cupboard so it is off the counter (wife really like a "clean" counter).

ScottL

#8: Post by ScottL »

I will second the recommendation for an Aeropress if looking to make a strong single does of coffee with something that takes up a minimum of space.

Another option - the ECM Puristika. It's less than 8 inches wide. Only does espresso, no milk steaming.

Phobic (original poster)

#9: Post by Phobic (original poster) »

very useful suggestions on using and AeroPress thanks, since I own 1 I think it's a no brainer to just give this a try.

after a bit of research I've found a few Espresso Style Recipes here https://handground.com/grind/66-recipes ... ess-coffee scroll down to a little bit past halfway.

I also found this video which very helpfully shows me roughly where to grind on an EK - it's about the same grind as I'd use for Moka.

jpender

#10: Post by jpender »

Phobic wrote:that's really interesting, what mods did you do? were the mods specifically for high ratio?
Nothing. The Brikka is a modified moka pot by design. It's basically a Moka Express 3 with a slightly wider exit tube and a valve at the top of that. The coffee grounds get saturated early on with relatively cool water (~50°C) and then the valve stops the flow until the pressure builds to a certain point. Then the coffee flows out very quickly. The result is a brew that takes place at a lower temperature on average than a regular moka pot. You also get some foam as the coffee is forced through a small orifice. It's pseudo-crema but part of the marketing of the device. More important to me was that I never had to play any games to keep the brew from overheating like is usually necessary with a standard moka pot.

Phobic wrote:Assume you were grinding near to espresso grind for the moka to get 1:3.7, did you need to do anything different like use filter papers top and bottom? I've tried moka's using Aeropress filters, this improves clarity at the loss of mouth feel, but wondering if you'd need to do this to stop all the grounds being pushed through.
I ground somewhere between moka pot grind size and espresso. No paper filters.

The 1:3.7 ratio came from a study I did measuring %TDS and %extraction while varying grind size and brew time (stove setting). I almost always used 88g of water (where the fill line is in the lower reservoir). That resulted in a beverage size of roughly 60g. But the amount of coffee I used depended on how dense it was since I filled the basket, slightly mounded. In those tests most of the coffee was darker and the doses were about 17g. But I often used coffees that weren't as dark and about 20g would fit in the basket. Sometimes the coffee would allow a dose of 22g. So a ratio of 1:3 was not really that uncommon. I would get 6-7% TDS at times.

In addition to the efficiency difference (you'd essentially throw away 1/3 of a bag of coffee using an Aeropress to make a 6-7% concentrate) the taste was different between the Aeropress and Brikka. I wouldn't say that one is better than the other. But I had a preference and it wasn't simply due to the economics. As a one off the extra coffee required isn't that big of a deal. And an Aeropress is less expensive and simpler. But in my opinion neither is as good as a well-made espresso that is either pulled to 1:3 or diluted to that concentration.