JoGo Coffee Straw (Kickstarter)

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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yakster
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#1: Post by yakster »

This is a coffee straw with a filter mesh that allows you to drink coffee straight from a cupping bowl. Apparently, there's some concern on the Kickstarter about International shipping rates being higher than the purchase price, but they're working on reducing the shipping. I was tempted but want to know how much the shipping will end up being.

https://dailycoffeenews.com/2021/04/20/ ... ickstarter

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/co ... ing-straw/

They opened up the $17 super-early-bird and US shipping is $5 so I went ahead and backed it, even though I probably won't use it much. It would be handy for having a cup of coffee away from home, though if I don't want to use my travel press.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

Stavey

#2: Post by Stavey »

Good idea. I actually have been using this rattleware cupping brewer works great and super easy to use .

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rmongiovi

#3: Post by rmongiovi »

I think I'd be more concerned that by leaving the grounds in the cup while you drink it it keeps extracting. That doesn't seem optimal to me. Maybe it's better to allow a cupping to remain a cupping and just slurp a spoonful or three?

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yakster (original poster)
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#4: Post by yakster (original poster) »

It's much harder to over-extract an immersion brew than a pour-over, I'm thinking it shouldn't be an issue.
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

rmongiovi

#5: Post by rmongiovi » replying to yakster »

Not to be argumentative, but do you have a citation for that? Every immersion brew I've ever seen has a "brew for" time. People argue over the time, but I've never heard it doesn't matter. I'm not sure why that would be the case. Different chemicals will have different rates of diffusion and longer immersion times will change the balance of what shows up in the cup.

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yakster (original poster)
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#6: Post by yakster (original poster) »

-Chris

LMWDP # 272

rmongiovi

#7: Post by rmongiovi »

That is interesting. I wonder why he says 4 minutes the first time, 5 minutes the second time, and 7 or 8 minutes the last time?

A few years back there was a gentleman on here, from a UK forum if I remember correctly, who was recommending a 15 minute or more brew time. I tried it once (mostly by accident when I got distracted). I won't be repeating it.

I do agree with his comment about measuring what you do so that when you find what you like you can repeat it. That at least is common sense.

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Stavey

#8: Post by Stavey »

I have used the cupping brewer for awhile now and It has produced some of the best cups I've had.I thought Gardelli meant you taste it at 8 minutes . Not sure but it definitely works well. As far as 15 minutes, I know that I read somewhere that sucrose is still being extracted up to 15 minute mark which is possibly their thinking. I know that when I use my Kyoto brewer it brews for 6+ hours , however it is using ice water 1 drop at a time. Lots of different ways to get lots of different results.

jpender

#9: Post by jpender »

rmongiovi wrote:A few years back there was a gentleman on here, from a UK forum if I remember correctly, who was recommending a 15 minute or more brew time. I tried it once (mostly by accident when I got distracted). I won't be repeating it.
I tried to do what he was doing. I failed to replicate his results. There was probably something I was doing differently than him. Nonetheless I compared brews of varying lengths (3min, 6min, 10min, 20min, and 40min). The longest extractions tasted different but were still very drinkable. I measured the extraction yield and it continued to increase (in an insulated brewer) all the way out to 40min. But 90% of the extraction happened in the first 3-6 minutes. As I recall the best tasting coffee to me for the grind I was using was at about 6min. The guy from the U.K. preferred really long brews, 30 minutes or more.

When I have cupped coffee I found that it never got worse with time. I would taste the cupped coffee long after it went cold and it was still fine, sometimes better.

DamianWarS
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#10: Post by DamianWarS »

yakster wrote:This is a coffee straw with a filter mesh that allows you to drink coffee straight from a cupping bowl. Apparently, there's some concern on the Kickstarter about International shipping rates being higher than the purchase price, but they're working on reducing the shipping. I was tempted but want to know how much the shipping will end up being.

https://dailycoffeenews.com/2021/04/20/ ... ickstarter

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/co ... ing-straw/

They opened up the $17 super-early-bird and US shipping is $5 so I went ahead and backed it, even though I probably won't use it much. It would be handy for having a cup of coffee away from home, though if I don't want to use my travel press.
it's interesting, sort of like the bripe. in terms of the extraction once you break the crust the coffee sinks and effectively the brew stops (unless you agitate). there is a concentration gradient within the sunk coffee that if left alone will stay there. similar to a tea bag, if you don't giggle the tea bag you don't extract the tea. the issue I can see with the straw is the common habit of putting the staw to the bottom and stirring, agitating the coffee each time. however as the water cools there are diminishing returns with extraction since straws are not typically paired with hot drinks since you can't slurp them and so there is a burning hazard, in practice, you wait until it's safe to drink, this is about 70°C at the hottest. (we can slurp hotter but not suck from a straw hotter). I would think with typical immersion techniques of breaking the crust between 4-5 min then waiting for it to cool is not going to be a problem with the straw. but here's the rub, if you do that you don't even need a straw because all the grinds are at the bottom and the cooling time should be more than sufficient to settle all of the coffee to the bottom leaving each sip free of grit (until you reach the bottom of course). I think I would end up opening the straw and putting my coffee in there trapping it inside the straw treating it like a tea infuser.