Is 240 v significantly better for Decent Espresso pourover function ?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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Chert

#1: Post by Chert »

Moderators, please consider merge to Decent Espresso Coffee Brewing

With 240 v machines now available and brew accessories too, DE brew space could well be revisited in a devoted thread. A TomC expressed it in above thread, brew precision and espresso with temp and flow control in one light weight machine sounds like a great thing for coffee catering.

Is 240 v significantly better for DE pourover fun?
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culturesub

#2: Post by culturesub »

Why would this make a difference?

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Chert (original poster)

#3: Post by Chert (original poster) »

In same light as faster steaming, water could stay at brew temp for pour over flow rates better, perhaps. Thus my question.
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culturesub

#4: Post by culturesub »

I know nothing about a DE but there is no reason that a 110 wouldn't stay at brew temp on it. My fellow stays at brew temp no problem, and I brew at boiling.

Nunas
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#5: Post by Nunas »

It isn't the voltage that matters, it's the power drawn by the heater (Watts). So, a bigger heater (in Watts) would heat more quickly and recover faster when called upon to heat. However, this does not necessarily mean more steam, as that function is controlled electronically, not only in a DE but in all espresso machines. In a boiler machine, you might see this as slightly less drop-off in the steam pressure while steaming. But in a thermoblock machine, it wouldn't likely make any difference.

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Chert (original poster)

#6: Post by Chert (original poster) »

The thread I link in first post implies that the Caffe crema style or allonge can't hold the temperature in the DE1 TomC was using. and it's stated that for pourover function 4 ml/sec flow rate is the limiting rate that can hold temperature. Is that still correct?

The 230 volt machines do produce higher volume steam compared to the 110V for each unit Pro, XL, XXL; however the group head functions between the 120V vs 230 V are the same? I'll ask in the Decent thread; they must be, else if higher flow rates with stable etraction temperatures occur with the 230V models it would probably have come up and I've not seen that.
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Brewzologist
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#7: Post by Brewzologist »

Flint; I have a new DE1Pro 110v machine and make V60 pour-overs with it daily. Using tank preheating I can maintain 8ml/s at 100C. I'm using the pour-over basket and 20-30sec pulses with rests between over about 3 min for a total draw down time of about 4min. This is a variant of Rao's DE1 recipe, at 17:1 ratio. The only thing I now do manual is a Rao spin after the last pulse to flatten the bed. Happy with the results versus years of pouring from kettles. HTH.

EDIT: I think some of the earlier DE1 machines may have had a lower max flow rate limit but not the new ones.

ira
Team HB

#8: Post by ira »

One of the reasons i want a Decent is for the brewing function, but it's hardly ever mentioned. Is it a commonly used feature among Decent users?

Ira

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Jeff
Team HB

#9: Post by Jeff »

Some people think it's great for a single cup or so. The clearance usually means you have to rotate the drip tray to fit a cup and dripper in place. It's my opinion that there's as much obsession over which drip technique to use among DE1 users as the enthusiast community in general.

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Chert (original poster)

#10: Post by Chert (original poster) »

@ Steve: right on, man. Your answer suggests if devoted to pourover one could do a liter batch of really good stuff and have a single serve going for the extra special stuff , say for a road show.

@ira and Jeff. That's the other intent of the thread, to hear some more among Decent users of pourover.

Is Rao + extra parts the way to go, or is it just as good to keep espresso capable and still pourover without implementing shower screen. Even if I never pick up a decent, let HB community hear from users about the full function of the work of John and team Decent.
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