I brew v60s with a cone to shape the coffee bed

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
DamianWarS

#1: Post by DamianWarS »

a well-known problem with more pure cone brewers like v60 is it's hard to get water to get to the bottom for a sufficient bloom this is why Rao excavates and Hoffmann does a vigorous swirl during the bloom phase. These solutions are fine but they are treating the problem not really correcting it doing some a sort of aggressive approach at getting the water to wet all grinds. I've seen Rao and Perger advocate for shaping the dry bed first into a sort of bird nest so I took this to the next level and took a cone (not a brewer cone but an actual cone) and used this to shape the dry bed before I add water. I insert the cone and roll it along the walls and it presses the coffee bed out into a thin layer around the brewer, the harder you roll it around the thinning the layer becomes. Perhaps it's from prewetting the paper of pressing the coffee but the coffee keeps this shape perfectly fine. I remove the cone and start the bloom and I find it blooms incredibly easily and all I need to do is some gentle stirs. the rest of the brew is normal.

culturesub

#2: Post by culturesub »

Only thing you're missing though is by adding in some agitation you're increasing extraction in your bloom, when you will have the highest level of extraction.

I do a flat bed, then a 3x :45 bloom. I'll do a rao spin and use the Melo drop glass stirrer to stir a few times. I then Melo drip pulse pour at :45, 1:15, 1:45 and 2:15. I will usually also do a quick stir on that :45 pour. For the 2:15 pour, I usually do a quick bare kettle pour on the edges to get the coffee off the wall, then finish with a MD pour. I spin after each pour as well.

I usually get between 22-24% EYs like this.

DamianWarS

#3: Post by DamianWarS »

culturesub wrote:Only thing you're missing though is by adding in some agitation you're increasing extraction in your bloom, when you will have the highest level of extraction.
The purpose the the bloom, at least my purpose, is to sufficiently wet the grinds as quick and thorough as possible. I use a 3:1 ratio for the bloom so for 20g I add 60ml of water. The thin layer of dry coffee against the walls allows the complete bed to absorb water quickly. Agitation like Rao's excavating or Hoffmann's spin can still be used they just don't need to be used as an extra measure to wet the grinds and by the time you start you realise all the grinds are wet. Additional agitation still occurs such as during the pour or stir at the beginning of the draw down and things like the rao spin. I don't have a refractometer to measure TDS so I can't tell you what the extraction %. How are you measuring extraction?

culturesub

#4: Post by culturesub » replying to DamianWarS »

I have a VST. I understand the purpose of a bloom, but adding in agitation both increases extraction AND really ensures there are no hidden dry pockets so its a win win!

DamianWarS

#5: Post by DamianWarS » replying to culturesub »

The dry pockets are the most important reason to agitate during the bloom and do so as aggressively as possibly to accomplish the goal which is to wet the grinds and quickly. V60 brewers create a dry pocket problem at the bottom of the cone which is inherent in their design, hense the need to agitate. However if you eliminate these dry pockets the need to agitate decreases and I'm saying using a cone shaped object (like a wooden block) to roll and press the coffee into a thin layer on the walls eliminates these pockets and wets the grinds quicker and thus eliminates the need for aggressive agitation during the bloom since the goal is accomplished.

culturesub

#6: Post by culturesub » replying to DamianWarS »

I disagree. The most important reason to agitate is to increase extraction, especially during the time when you will extract the most from your coffee.

Pingel

#7: Post by Pingel »

@culturesub:

If you are so focused on agitation - then why do you use the Melodrip? It is my experience that it works towards less agitation...

DamianWarS

#8: Post by DamianWarS »

culturesub wrote:I disagree. The most important reason to agitate is to increase extraction, especially during the time when you will extract the most from your coffee.
With the bloom (imo and to which you are welcome to disagree), agitation helps to wet the grinds and wetting the grinds helps for better extraction. If you can wet the grinds without aggressive agitation and still be under 10 seconds the agitation part looses its role as the goal of wetting the grinds is accomplished. It's not that less is more, agitate your heart out, it's just that it no longer functions to wet the grinds as the wetting is more efficient, so what's the point? It is not the agitation during the bloom that increases extraction, it is the wet grinds but depending on your method more aggressive forms of agitation is needed to wet the grinds, I'm simply saying I found a way that doesn't need aggressive agitation and the grinds get wet, and get wet quickly but YMMV.

culturesub

#9: Post by culturesub » replying to DamianWarS »

If you took a refractometer and measured it both ways, the way we agitation would have a higher TDS 100% of the time.

DamianWarS

#10: Post by DamianWarS » replying to culturesub »

I think we've entered a degressed topic here. I'm not trying to discourage agitation in the bloom, I'm showing a way I've found to wet the grinds more quickly and efficiently and in my observations agitation is less needed however the agitation part is not the point and you may agitate as much as you wish. The point is a more efficient way of wetting the grounds during the bloom.

I've attached a pic of typical dry flat bed, a "birds nest" that you shape with a spoon (Rao/Perger) then this cone bed that is made with a cone rolling and pressing the coffee into a thin layer along the walls of the brewer

Flat bed
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Bird's nest (Rao/Perger)
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Cone bed
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