How to brew with a Chemex [video] - Page 2

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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JohnB.
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#11: Post by JohnB. »

Has anyone tried the Hario cloth filters? I've been thinking about picking up one of these brewers:
http://www.avenue18.ca/TEAPOT/Hario/cof ... _DPW_3.htm
Seems like a nice alternative to the Chemex w/paper filters. Of course then I'd "need" one of these:
http://www.avenue18.ca/TEAPOT/Hario/cof ... kettle.htm I'll wait a few months & add them to my X'mas wish list. Already spent my birthday goodwill with the MCaL. :)
LMWDP 267

Richard

#12: Post by Richard »

kemperj wrote:. . . polyester 5 micron filter felt from Mcmaster-Carr. . . .
Were you able to source the MSDS for that product? I do not see it on McMaster-Carr's website. While attracted to the idea, I need to know about the material's safety and applicability to food service.
Richard J. Wyble

kemperj

#13: Post by kemperj »

Richard,

I didn't look for one. I wasn't too worried about since it is supposed to be a high quality H2O filter.

Jeff

Richard

#14: Post by Richard »

kemperj wrote:I didn't look for one. I wasn't too worried about since it is supposed to be a high quality H2O filter.
I read the description as generic, without potable water or food being mentioned. My reading is one of describing an array of liquids. To wit:
McMaster-Carr's Pages wrote:Ideal for very fine filtering of water, organic solvents, organic acids, petroleum oils, weak alkalies, and mineral acids. Sold in individually packaged sheets for convenience. Max. temperature is 300° F. Color is white.
Richard J. Wyble

kemperj

#15: Post by kemperj »

I'm sure if you give them a call they could give you more info.

jpreiser

#16: Post by jpreiser »

shadowfax wrote:All of the above, with the addendum that whoever made that video was clearly under the influence of a HUGE amount of Chemex coffee! :lol:
I thought the same thing. Very energetic. My biggest issue was the text not being on the screen long enough to easily read without backing up.
RAS wrote:A question though, and pardon me if the answer is obvious: Are they just rinsing the filter with cold water? Guess you could rinse it with hot which would also preheat the carafe.
I've been just rinsing my Chemex filters with cold water and letting most of the water out drip before putting them in the carafe. I haven't tried rinsing with hot water so can't compare whether there's a difference between hot and cold water rinses. The video looks like they put a new filter in the carafe and run hot water from the kettle through it to rinse.

Bluegrod

#17: Post by Bluegrod »

I have not tried the cold water rinse as I have always used hot water for two reasons one it preheats the carafe and two it preheats the filter and upper part of brewer so that it wont suck so much of the heat from the water as it is brewing the coffee. I will usually rinse the filter just as the water is coming to a boil then pour it out just before pouring the water in to brew.

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dsc

#18: Post by dsc »

Hi guys,

two questions:

- why is the dose so low? I though the SCAE standard was 55g per 1000ml not 750ml

- why 3-4min? is that for 55g? it's really down to how slow you pour I guess, but there's no way I'm going to get 4min with 12g for a single cup

Regards,
dsc.

weheritage

#19: Post by weheritage »

Great video however a true Chemex proficianita would most likely boil their water in a glass Chemex tea kettle boiler. Allow the water to come to a boil and remove it from the heat. Chemex recommends 200 +/- 5 degrees.

I made all of the coffee in my coffee house, the Daily Grind in Nashville, Indiana -1976 to 1985 (still in business), using theChemex system.
Image

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rasqual

#20: Post by rasqual »

Richard wrote:Were you able to source the MSDS for that product? I do not see it on McMaster-Carr's website. While attracted to the idea, I need to know about the material's safety and applicability to food service.
The MSDS for such felt will ever and always only speak to the polyester -- which is inert.

Unfortunately, regardless of the manufacturer, it's nearly impossible to get specific a MSDS for any possible contaminants the material may contain.

There are known lubricants used in the process of making the felt, and the MSDS may be obtained for these.

Alas, I've still not been able to scrape the minimum together for a purchase of a substantial quantity of food grade material. But I've used the McMaster felt, washing it carefully in Seventh Generation Free and Clear or Shaklee Basic H