How much coffee do you use for 1 pot?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Fishchris

#1: Post by Fishchris » Oct 05, 2019, 10:52 am

I guess we can use gm's, or ounces... Or, cup measurements. I can convert, if I need to.
Now, I know people are going to have their own personal preferences, so I'm not asking what the "correct" amount is. What's right for you, might not be enough for me. Just curious.

Also, my "pot" is not the standard size.... I have always told people I use enough grounds for a pot, but then brew straight into my own personal coffee vessel....
But honestly, I'm not even sure what most folks use for a regular pot, so I'm really curious.

But when I ask how much coffee do you use for a pot, I mean, for a standard American 60oz pot.

User avatar
guijan12

#2: Post by guijan12 » Oct 05, 2019, 10:58 am

For a pot (filter) I use 28-30 grams per 500 ml water.
Depending on the number of people drinking and the beans I adjust this to the occasion. :wink:
Regards,

Guido

User avatar
[creative nickname]
Supporter ♡

#3: Post by [creative nickname] » Oct 05, 2019, 11:12 am

Our standard morning pot (shared by the wife and I) is 1200mL of water to 75g of coffee. That's a 16:1 ratio, which is generally what I prefer in terms of balancing mouthfeel vs sweetness and clarity in the cup.
LMWDP #435

belegnole

#4: Post by belegnole » Oct 05, 2019, 11:18 am

I use a brew ratio that is in grams and adjust as needed. For example for the longest time I was being for nor than myself and was limited to a 1000ml kettle. I also sometimes would want two large mugs for myself which was close to 800ml. I then took some older ratios that I liked and made it simple for myself. I just take the amount of water I want to use in grams and multiply by .06 and get haw many grams of coffee to use. It's something like a 1:16.6666 ratio.

User avatar
Andy

#5: Post by Andy » Oct 05, 2019, 12:52 pm

Typically I brew a 20oz pot -- so, 600mL, using 40g coffee. That's 15:1, but some water remains in the grounds bed, so really 14.5:1 (or whatever; I haven't actually weighed the resulting volume). I grind so brew time is 2:30 to 3:00 when using V60.

Fishchris

#6: Post by Fishchris » Oct 05, 2019, 8:50 pm

Thank you guys. I was thinking my mix was really strong... But I had to see some examples and do some math + metric to American conversions. As it turns out, my mix is about 8 or 9:1. So now you guys see why I don't drink my coffee black, other wise heck, I'd just drink tar oil :D lol

But with my 9:1 mix, of very fine ground beans, it takes a shot of heavy cream to smooth it out.... And some Sucralose drops. Freaking love it this way though :)

User avatar
[creative nickname]
Supporter ♡

#7: Post by [creative nickname] » Oct 05, 2019, 10:24 pm

Well, I drink mocha pot coffee black (8:1 to 10:1) and straight espresso (usually 2:1 to 3:1), so there is no reason why a high brew ratio requires milk or sugar. If you buy high quality beans, roast them to a light or moderate level, and then brew them competently, the result will taste great without the need for additives.

But with that said, if you want to brew it bitter and then sweeten it back into balance, more power to you! That is certainly a popular approach with plenty of people around the world.
LMWDP #435

Fishchris

#8: Post by Fishchris » Oct 06, 2019, 12:03 am

[creative nickname] wrote: so there is no reason why a high brew ratio requires milk or sugar.
Other than taste :D lol I'm sorry. It's just a personal thing. I love good coffee, but I love heavy cream and sweetener too. And for me, it just goes great with good, strong coffee :)

SJM

#9: Post by SJM » Oct 06, 2019, 12:30 pm

In the Moccamaster Technivorm I use 40 gm of beans (Northbound's Mainline) and 500 ml of water.

jpender

#10: Post by jpender » Oct 06, 2019, 12:40 pm

[creative nickname] wrote:Well, I drink mocha pot coffee black (8:1 to 10:1) and straight espresso (usually 2:1 to 3:1), so there is no reason why a high brew ratio requires milk or sugar. If you buy high quality beans, roast them to a light or moderate level, and then brew them competently, the result will taste great without the need for additives.
+1

Regardless of the brewing device (espresso->long black, moka pot, Aeropress) I most often end up with a modest sized cup that is around 2% strength. That corresponds roughly to coffee brewed with a 10:1 ratio of water to beans. Weaker coffee usually leaves me wishing it were stronger. The only time I add milk or sugar is when the coffee is bitter: Instant coffee; really dark roasts; and bad coffee are all in that category.

But lots of people *love* milk based drinks. I wouldn't be surprised if there are more of them than those who drink coffee black, at least in the U.S.