Help - EK43 stall / produces too much fines?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Senfromsydney
Posts: 19
Joined: 5 months ago

#1: Post by Senfromsydney »

Hey all!

Does the Ek43 stock coffee burrs requires a lot of beans to season?

I'm currently having trouble brewing due to TBT being too long on V60, Kalita, and Origami. 15g 5 pours 250 - can reach 3:30 to 4:00 since I changed to EK43 standard stock burr post-2015.

Filter: Abaca Medium Dark Roast
Grind Size: tried 8-16 range on EK43
Coffe beans: Ethiopian, Kenya, Colombian
Water: Natural Spring Water (never changed)

Previous grinder: c40 25-30 clicks range brew was ideal

Tricks: Use the below to remove silver skin, and use a paper towel to remove fines

None of the above worked

viteaux
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 months ago

#2: Post by viteaux »

How does your coffee taste? 10+ years of using a 185 Kalita 18:300 and was never able to get 3-4 min TBT. I enlarged the holes, used an metal filter to lift to keep the Kalita filter off the brewer, ground more coarse, you name it, I did it. I found that grinding finer and a brew time of 5-6 min gave me juicy, sweet great tasting Ethiopians and Kenyans. I'm using a Pulsar now, and still around 5 min TBT. My own personal opinion, which may not be shared by many, is the 3-4 min TBT is shenanigan's. Taste rules. TBT's be damned :D

helicon47
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#3: Post by helicon47 »

Amen to that! Since changing up my Pulsar brewing method I've learned that the ~5-minute brews are far more pleasing to my palate - and better extracted, per my TDS meter - than the 3:30 or 4-minute brews ever were. My current approach actually involves actively *trying* to clog the filter using both dry and wet WDT as well as swirling. If that fails, I close the valve slightly to reduce the flow. It's counterintuitive but the results speak for themselves.

erik82
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#4: Post by erik82 »

Have you tried just grinding coarser? Your post doesn't tell anything you did with the EK43 to try and solve it.

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baldheadracing
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#5: Post by baldheadracing »

Total Brew Time (TBT) is an important metric when developing recipes for use in a commercial environment. A method that gives a 2:30 TBT and tastes about as good as a method with a 5:00 TBT is better for efficiency and guests' experience. Many recipes that you see on the Internet are designed with cafe use in mind, and so stress shorter TBT. In addition, the format and rules of the World Brewer's Cup (WBrC) are aimed at commercial use, and thus a shorter TBT can be an advantage in competition - and plenty of people seem to want to use the recipe of the latest WBrC champion, even if they aren't restricted by the WBrC time limits.

In almost all home applications, TBT is not of concern - I'd be surprised if many here regularly use the acronym.

That being said, it can be fun to develop a method restricted by a short TBT; well, I've been having fun for the past couple of weeks 8).
-"Good quality brings happiness as you use it" - Nobuho Miya, Kamasada

viteaux
Posts: 40
Joined: 10 months ago

#6: Post by viteaux »

baldheadracing wrote:Total Brew Time (TBT) is an important metric when developing recipes for use in a commercial environment. A method that gives a 2:30 TBT and tastes about as good as a method with a 5:00 TBT is better for efficiency and guests' experience. Many recipes that you see on the Internet are designed with cafe use in mind, and so stress shorter TBT. In addition, the format and rules of the World Brewer's Cup (WBrC) are aimed at commercial use, and thus a shorter TBT can be an advantage in competition - and plenty of people seem to want to use the recipe of the latest WBrC champion, even if they aren't restricted by the WBrC time limits.

In almost all home applications, TBT is not of concern - I'd be surprised if many here regularly use the acronym.
Thanks for that background. I'm not sure where I first heard of it, but early in my journey the 3 minute TBT was the yardstick by which I measured my brews. I chased that dragon for years, trying different brewers, hacking them, different grind sizes and whatnot trying to hit what I thought was ideal. It was on this site where I learned that its all about the taste, and a bunch of dogma was dispelled. With good technique and good beans, even a jabroni like me can make some killer coffee.

AnotherADDiction
Posts: 161
Joined: 1 year ago

#7: Post by AnotherADDiction »

Yes, thanks for the info. I initially wondered why the concern about time, but now I know. I was also shocked that some peoples dragons aren't sharp and are legal ;)

I think l that I will see what my time is (I do feel that it is probably around the 3 minute mark)

May you always enjoy a great cup.

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yakster
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#8: Post by yakster »

Hemicellulose breaks down into sugars with longer contact with hot water, somewhere around the four minute mark. As long as your not extracting unpleasant tasting components from your coffee there's no need to reduce your TBT.

Optimal Brew Time
-Chris

LMWDP # 272

jpender
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#9: Post by jpender »

Thanks for that piece of information, Chris. It's probably why the long steeps I experimented with some years ago all had an odd, cloying sweetness that was missing in the shorter brews I did.

Senfromsydney (original poster)
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#10: Post by Senfromsydney (original poster) »

Sorry for the delay. I didn't receive any notification on this post.

I did try coarser at dial 16, i tried many small ratio 13:200 and it always land at 3:00 mark. While if im using a c40 it's around 2:30 mark.

I've noticed the stall / slow drawdown time starts after second pours or at the last bits.

If I grind finer on ek43 the tbt will land around 4:00.

I've read somewhere that 98mm burr requires a lot of bean to go through to season, I hope mine is the problem.