Hario Water Flow Restrictor

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
chang00

#1: Post by chang00 »

I know, hand drip coffee gets no respect in the world of espresso, but this tip courtesy of Espressoparts is quite helpful.

The brass filter used as a flow restrictor on the Hario truly makes hand control easy. Without it, water flows out of the Hario Buono at about 200g in 10 seconds. With the flow restrictor, at full speed, about 30 seconds. If the water stream is kept to a vertical, about 60 seconds. Highly recommended.




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shadowfax

#2: Post by shadowfax »

Interesting. I wonder why they chose a filter rather than a jet... seems like it'd be prone to mineralizing and changing flow characteristics. Barismo has made a jet for awhile that's made out of teflon, IIRC. I haven't tried it myself. Do let us know how yours holds up over time!
Nicholas Lundgaard

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bostonbuzz

#3: Post by bostonbuzz »

Interesting. How does it stay in, does the brass deform a little bit to wedge it in there? I was/am looking for something similar for my cremina inlet to prevent shooting water disturbing the puck. However, it would have to be flush with the cylinder wall.
LMWDP #353

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ex trahere

#4: Post by ex trahere »

shadowfax wrote:Interesting. I wonder why they chose a filter rather than a jet... seems like it'd be prone to mineralizing and changing flow characteristics. Barismo has made a jet for awhile that's made out of teflon, IIRC. I haven't tried it myself. Do let us know how yours holds up over time!
Their choice of brass is interesting to me as well. I second the letting us know how it holds up over time.

For the past six or seven months, I have been using barismo's kettle gicleur (flow restrictor) everyday for wood neck and v60 pours, and it really does make hand-pour a breeze. You are correct that it is made of Teflon. It probably goes without saying, but it is a must that one transfers water to the kettle from another vessel, as Teflon is not suitable that high of a temp to be on the stovetop.

I must warn you though, it may spoil you once you get used to it. If I am in the position of using a hario kettle without the gicleur, I forget about the lack of built in flow restriction and it just gushes out.

Here is a cool article from the blog Jamie wrote about flow rate and intervals. It was posted before the restrictors became commercially available, I believe.

http://blog.barismo.com/2010/11/its-all ... ld-be.html
A posse ad esse
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dustin360

#5: Post by dustin360 »

Man, that things looks wierd and awesome. I love how small things like this can make a big difference. I wonder if that fits my homeloo kettle.

Heres the link for my kettle, its one of the most reasonably priced kettles out there.

http://www.homeloo.com/shop/product_inf ... cts_id=562

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Boldjava
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#6: Post by Boldjava »

I have used several kettles, to include the Hario V60 (mine has the Barismo restricter) and the Paiko. For the money, the best pour out there, without a need for a restricter is the Bonavita, just landed in NAmerica. We have a traveling road show going with one over at GCBC. With the design (pouring tip), you can literally pour a drop at a time. $30, available in many places. I snagged the kettle at:

http://www.buzzartisanalcoffeeroaster.c ... ita-Kettle



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LMWDP #339

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barry

#7: Post by barry »

shadowfax wrote:I wonder why they chose a filter rather than a jet...
a jet can get plugged by one little chunk 'o gunk... a sintered brass filter is more forgiving of renegade particulates.

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shadowfax

#8: Post by shadowfax »

True, but a big sintered brass filter has a tremendous amount of inaccessible metal surface that can get slowly clogged/restricted by buildup of precipitated particles from water that's evaporated; I'm curious if this would make it slow down over time. I say this because I had a sintered brass filter over my gicleur in my GS3 and it wound up clogging worse than the gicleur itself. An orifice can get clogged easier, but I'd think a big-ish one like for this application wouldn't be too hard to clear and clean.
Nicholas Lundgaard

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dcupstateNY

#9: Post by dcupstateNY »

bostonbuzz wrote:It probably goes without saying, but it is a must that one transfers water to the kettle from another vessel, as Teflon is not suitable that high of a temp to be on the stovetop.
I've been using my kettle with this gicleur on direct gas heat for a couple of years now ... no problem. I'm assuming that the gicleur never gets hotter than the water inside the kettle. And, I believe the melting point for Teflon is extremely high, so it shouldn't be an issue.
Ciao,
Dave

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PaikMan

#10: Post by PaikMan »

I came upon a similar (same?) item while shopping for water filters at filtersfast.com and noticed how similar this looks to the one from the OP. Product name is 'GeneralAire GA4004 Humidifier Strainer Screen'.
Is this the same one that espressoparts offers? I can't seem to find it on their site anymore. I added one to my order just to try it out in my Bonavita, only $3.