Hario Air pourover kettle and microwave safety

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
boren

#1: Post by boren »

The Air is made of PCT resin which is supposed to be heat resistant, with melting temperature of about 300°C / 570 °F. Could it be that when Hario says it's not microwave-safe they just want to avoid user injury due to superheated purified water "exploding"? If that's the issue then I can easily avoid it by not using purified water or by putting a chopstick in the kettle.

Is there a similar pourover kettle which is microwave safe? The only one I could find is the Orphan Espresso Pico pitcher, but at $50 shipped it's just way too expensive for what it is.

Update: Hario Japan replied to me in email that the reason they don't mark this as microwave safe is not due to the risk of chemicals leaching out, but that the plastic may deform in the microwave. I can take this risk and will order one.

Pressino

#2: Post by Pressino »

I'm guessing that Hario would advise against use in a microwave due to concerns about leaching potentially hazardous chemicals (in this case perhaps pthalates) rather than physical damage, like an explosion. That's just a guess.

baldheadracing
Supporter ♡

#3: Post by baldheadracing »

Eastman doesn't show any applications of that plastic involving heat, FWIW.

Perhaps something like this?
https://www.trendglas-jena.com/en/spd/1 ... VER-kettle
I have no experience with any glass kettle; I have an Orphan Espresso Pico for travel/microwave duty.

boren (original poster)

#4: Post by boren (original poster) »

Thanks, this looks interesting.

How do you like your Pico?

baldheadracing
Supporter ♡

#5: Post by baldheadracing »

I was actually looking for another glass pourover kettle that I've seen before - I'm not sure but it may be this one - this is one of many sellers on AliExpress with the same product pictures; this is a random seller/page: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4001244712452.html

As for the Pico, mine is its predecessor ("Orphan Espresso 3-4-5") which didn't have the lid. I did subsequently purchase the lid as it has a hole to hold a thermometer, but I've never actually used the lid :oops:.

What happened is my travel setup was at one point the Soto Helix collapsible V-60 dripper with the OE pitcher. Then the Aeropress Go came out and I switched to using that brewer for travel. Then travelling ... stopped.

When I was using the OE pitcher, I had thought that the metal flow gate might be annoying to use/lose but that never happened. The 3mm opening gives an incredible amount of control and the shape of the "spout" lets one get very close to the coffee bed. The only annoyance was with using hard water. The silicone will show deposits from hard water (limescale) on the surface, leading to a milky appearance. A bit of vinegar clears that up. The other 'thing' is that it is a one-cup kettle; capacity is about 350ml IIRC. Now, you might think that one could just refill the kettle for, say, a 500ml brew, but the kettle will get hot, and you'll want to have a towel to insulate holding the kettle for the second pour (just like a Takahiro or some Kalita kettles :mrgreen: ).

_Ryan_

#6: Post by _Ryan_ »

I wasn't confident in any of the plastic jugs for microwave safety for prolonged/repeated use.

I wanted my kit to be glass free as I at times must go to hospital for treatment and also use the same kit for camping trips- this ruled out the use of Pyrex jugs which are fantastic for microwave use, although you'd still be transferring to a goose-neck jug to pour.

My glass-free travel kit consists of:
- metal goose-neck jug.
- V60-02, plastic.
- metal milk pitcher (for brewing double batches, as I normally drink two 20g espresso, or a 20g espresso and a pour-over) this isn't needed if you only ever brew a single beverage.
- grinder.
- Nanopresso.. (not relevant to this conversation though)

When there is a kettle available, easy.
When there isn't a kettle available, I microwave water in two mugs(to get my 540g) and then tip the water (carefully!) into the goose-neck jug.

Is there a reason you don't want a metal jug?

boren (original poster)

#7: Post by boren (original poster) »

I prefer to be able to microwave the pouring pitcher itself, to avoid loss of heat when transferring water between vessels. The OE Pico seems to be the only option, but I don't think it's worth $50 (including shipment).

_Ryan_

#8: Post by _Ryan_ » replying to boren »

Fair enough, I preheat (somewhat) the metal jug with hot tap water. With a thermometer on the jug I'm pouring the bloom at ~95deg, second pour at 90deg.

boren (original poster)

#9: Post by boren (original poster) »

Update: Hario Japan replied to me in email that the reason they don't mark this as microwave safe is not due to the risk of chemicals leaching out, but that the plastic may deform in the microwave. I can take this risk and will order one.

Pressino

#10: Post by Pressino »

Here's a link to a site discussing using plastics (even those currently classed as "food safe") in microwave ovens:

https://www.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats ... -microwave

I won't comment on what Hario told you, but thought you might find the above link interesting.