Good tutorial for French Press?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
gingi

#1: Post by gingi »

Hi there people,
I know it's not an espresso-related question - but still - can someone recommend a good, reliable, professional tutorial for French press?
Thanks,
Gingi.

User avatar
TomC
Team HB

#2: Post by TomC »

Probably can't do better than this.

Turn your French press into a French pull

User avatar
RapidCoffee
Team HB

#3: Post by RapidCoffee »

Stumptown has a comprehensive set of brewing "how to" guides, including one for French press.
John

IntrepidQ3

#4: Post by IntrepidQ3 »

TomC wrote:Probably can't do better than this.

Turn your French press into a French pull
This sounds a technique I would like to try!
"As you know, an explorer's temperament requires two basic qualities: optimism in attempt, criticism in work."-Freud

User avatar
boar_d_laze

#5: Post by boar_d_laze »

"Wendleboe" FP method is beyond fussy, and beyond anything I'm willing to do. The French Pull is fussier still. Why bother when the problem is solved by throwing a little technology and a couple o' bucks at it?

A cheap scale, a grinder good for FP, a digital kettle, a long spoon and an Espro are all you need.

BDL
Drop a nickel in the pot Joe. Takin' it slow. Waiter, waiter, percolator

User avatar
TomC
Team HB

#6: Post by TomC »

I can't possibly imagine what could be considered "fussy" about using a french press, whether you use it as it was originally intended, or just reversing the order and pulling out the grounds and dumping them.

I don't even use it all the time. Many times when I'm analyzing roasts, I use my small french press then filter it thru a rinsed paper filter. Still pretty quick, and delivers a richer, yet clean cup with good flavor separation.

User avatar
boar_d_laze

#7: Post by boar_d_laze »

Sorry Tom if it seemed dismissive. I didn't mean to be insulting.

The deal with the French Pull and other methods which involve skimming or removing grinds before pouring is that you have to be so careful not to make a mess with them or spill them back into the carafe.

Also, like many people, I don't want to be tied to the sink, preferring to press at the table or on the patio with the online newspaper, or in the living room in front of the TV.

BDL
Drop a nickel in the pot Joe. Takin' it slow. Waiter, waiter, percolator

User avatar
TomC
Team HB

#8: Post by TomC »

Gotcha. I can see not wanting to be married to the sink for each coffee prep as well. And like you, it's probably one of the leading reasons I don't utilize it that often.

If I had half a brain, I would have bought more than one, back when they were on a fire sale at Sweet Maria's. The nice little 4 cup one, with an unbreakable "plastic" SAN brewing carafe. Having 3 or 4 of those (only about $20 at the time!) lined up would be the trick when evaluating home roast profiles of the same coffee. One of Carl Staub's incredible articles explains it better than I have time to. But it beats cupping bowls in my opinion.

User avatar
damonbowe

#9: Post by damonbowe »

If you want FP quality and multiple coffees, it wouldn't be bad to brew small batches in glasses, mugs or bowls, and then pour them through a pre-wetted filter. It's not as glamorous as owning 5 FPs but also takes up less space in the cupboard. This is basically how they do it at all the cuppings I have attended.

I got an espro and I'm not that thrilled with the double filter thing. It still leaves fines and is generally more difficult to use than my $5 FP from Ikea.

Anyhoo, thanks for the tutorials! In addition, you can find a lot of tutorials on youtube and at other roasters.

User avatar
boar_d_laze

#10: Post by boar_d_laze »

damonbowe wrote:It's not as glamorous as owning 5 FPs...
Image
Dude!

BDL
Drop a nickel in the pot Joe. Takin' it slow. Waiter, waiter, percolator