Goldilocks Kettle - Page 2

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
jbviau
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#11: Post by jbviau »

Possible tangent: would you consider a 2-kettle solution? I use an OXO adjustable temp. kettle to boil water with and then transfer to OE's Pico silicone pouring pitcher (with lid) for pourover coffee. This combo has been working well for me for almost a year. The Pico's flow control is all I need.
"It's not anecdotal evidence, it's artisanal data." -Matt Yglesias

baldheadracing
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#12: Post by baldheadracing »

jpender wrote:That's good to know. If only I had a 220V outlet in my kitchen...
If you've got an outlet with:
- two 15amp sockets, convert to: https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-5031-I-R ... 127&sr=8-1
- two 20amp sockets, convert to: https://www.amazon.com/Leviton-5842-I-R ... 127&sr=8-2

... and, of course, mind your local electrical code requirements.

jpender

#13: Post by jpender »

You make it look like I can just switch the receptacle and magically get 220V.

baldheadracing
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#14: Post by baldheadracing » replying to jpender »

A lot of kitchen outlets have two separate 15 amp or 20 amp circuits. At least in Canada, any house wired in the last 50 or so years has to have at least one outlet on the kitchen counter that can take one of the duplex receptacles that I linked to. You can even buy external boxes to do it - these cost more because they have circuitry to protect against improper wiring and user error, e.g., quick220.com

Again, mind your local electrical code requirements.

... and AFAIK, there are no 3000w kettles certified for domestic use in North America.

jpender

#15: Post by jpender »

I wondered if you could combine circuits; didn't realize it was a common approach. That said, I'm not sure we have an outlet with two circuits. And I don't believe that there is an outlet that isn't on the same circuit as at least one other.

Kitchen wired about 20 years ago. Not in Canada.

Does GFCI screw up this idea?

baldheadracing
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#16: Post by baldheadracing »

jpender wrote:Does GFCI screw up this idea?
You can use a two-pole GFCI circuit breaker on your panel.

jpender

#17: Post by jpender »

I took a closer look at our setup. There are two sets of outlets, three on one side of the kitchen and four on the other side. Each has it's own 20A 120V circuit: hot, neutral, ground. Given their locations in the breaker box I think they are on the same bus, not that it matters. I could convert one of these circuits to 240V but then I'd have a set of outlets on one side of the kitchen all at 240V. That's not going to work. There are outlets for the oven and refrigerator and microwave but they are also all 120V, single breaker circuits. I think this would not be an easy job for someone like me who knows almost nothing. My wife would also not look kindly upon my messing with the breaker box. And an electrician, especially in this city, would probably want a lot of money.

I think a better solution is for me to buy a small kettle for my coffee instead of sharing the 1.7L one with my tea-guzzling wife. I rarely need more than a few hundred milliliters at a time. So I can halve the boiling time by filling a kettle of the same wattage with half as much water. Or I can just do what I do now: flip on the kettle first thing so that it's ready by the time I am.

baldheadracing
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#18: Post by baldheadracing »

jpender wrote: I think a better solution is for me to buy a small kettle for my coffee instead of sharing the 1.7L one with my tea-guzzling wife. I rarely need more than a few hundred milliliters at a time..
I sometimes use a Stagg EKG for that as a dripper cone fits on/in the kettle in place of the Stagg's lid so the cone warms up at the same time as the water (porcelain/glass/metal cone, not plastic). I'm often hand-grinding in those instances so the additional warm-up time doesn't matter.

CathyWeeks

#19: Post by CathyWeeks »

I sometimes use a Stagg EKG for that as a dripper cone fits on/in the kettle in place of the Stagg's lid so the cone warms up at the same time as the water
I am impressed with your cleverness and efficiency. :-)

jpender

#20: Post by jpender »

baldheadracing wrote:I sometimes use a Stagg EKG for that...
That's a beautiful looking kettle. But at 1200W it's not going to boil faster. A review I looked at said one of the downsides of the Stagg EKG is that it is slow to boil.

I occasionally wish for adjustable temperature control but I'm not sure it's worth an extra $135 for me. To be honest, I'm a bit leery of over-engineering in otherwise simple appliances. An expensive, microprocessor controlled toaster I bought in the past turned out to be a poor choice as it's electronics slowly went bad. They eventually were toast. And the thing never made toast any better than a basic, time-tested, metallic-strip type model that costs $25 and lasts for decades.

Our new $40 kettle arrived the other day. It's still in the box because, well, I sealed the leak in our 7 year-old kettle while we were waiting. Now we have two functioning kettles, either of which will boil faster than the Stagg EKG.

One thing I'm curious about: What happens if you set the temperature on the Stagg EKG above the local boiling point? This question is on the Fellow website FAQ for the kettle but, oddly, they don't actually answer the question. Does the kettle have an independent boil detection method? Or will it just keep trying to reach an unattainable temperature?