Getting floral and fruity from a Hario V60? - Page 2

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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DouloScott

#11: Post by DouloScott » Oct 13, 2014, 10:59 am

+1 for Heart, they basically are a Nordic roaster as their founder Wille Yli-Luoma is a Finn. Their coffee is one of the lightest roasts in the US if not the lightest. Another roaster that you might really like is Ruby out of Wisconsin (http://rubycoffeeroasters.com/). Also if you can find it http://supersoniccoffee.com/ is another contender for light roasts and delicious coffee. Of these Heart is my go to roaster and there is no tax when purchasing online as they are from Oregon.

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CaffeineAndKilos38

#12: Post by CaffeineAndKilos38 » Oct 13, 2014, 11:47 pm

Forgive me if any of these answers are obvious, but I thought I'd give my input since all I do is pour over at home. My glass V60 seems to result in a cup that is noticeably hotter after brewing than when I use a chemex. I've found that for some roasts I need to lower my water temperature when using a V60. I use a Bonavita digital kettle so manipulating temperatures is much easier. My standard is 200 degrees but for some roasts I've dropped down to 197-198 surprisingly that extra few degrees seems to make a difference when it comes to over extracting unwanted bitterness. Also I've found that with more delicate coffees that letting the water level lower before adding more takes care of some over extraction problems, as opposed to keeping the level consistent until the desired volume has been poured. So I'll let the beans bloom for 30-40 seconds with 1.5x the weight of the beans, so 30 grams of water for 40 grams of coffee. Then starting at the center I'll pour a slow controlled spiral without touching the edge of the filter, usually around 50-60 grams twice, waiting till the beans are just about to show through the receding water level. Then I'll pour the same spiral but also come back into the middle with it for around a 70 gram pour. By the time I hit my 16:1 ratio of 320 grams of water my brew time is up. And I always remove the V60 before all the water drains through the grounds, that last bit seems to add some bitterness. Hope some of this may help

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endlesscycles

#13: Post by endlesscycles » Oct 14, 2014, 9:54 pm

I've never tasted such vivid florals as from my most recent roasts of Aricha. Truly like chewing flowers. What's curious is that these roasts are actually much more developed than I've roasted in the past several years. Some really light roasts can taste grainy or lack aroma. I'm just going to say that Scott Rao knows what's up.
-Marshall Hance
Asheville, NC

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[creative nickname]
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#14: Post by [creative nickname] » Oct 14, 2014, 10:12 pm

Marshall, how long a time are you spending in development these days in your brewing roasts? How much increase do you add to BT over that time? As someone who has greatly enjoyed your roasts in the past, I'm very curious to get more details on what you now are doing differently.
LMWDP #435

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endlesscycles

#15: Post by endlesscycles » replying to [creative nickname] » Oct 15, 2014, 8:28 am

2min / 10C. Turns out letting 1st finish is generally worthwhile. I should have known.
-Marshall Hance
Asheville, NC

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jesse

#16: Post by jesse » Oct 25, 2014, 11:26 am

endlesscycles wrote:I've never tasted such vivid florals as from my most recent roasts of Aricha. Truly like chewing flowers.
My first pour of this was really floral. Subsequent pours have showcased more of the tamarind-like acidity than the floral component, which makes me wonder:

Is it possible to target floral characteristics? When I'm getting more nuance and florality out of a coffee, I perceive less acidity, and vice versa. I happen to quite like acidity, so it isn't a big issue, but for this coffee specifically, I'd like to go after more of the subtleties and reduce some of the brightness.