Gesha coffee brewing

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
sassypants15

#1: Post by sassypants15 »

Hello.

I was gifted some gesha coffee and I used a basic recipe with a kalita wave . I used my kinu grinder at 4+2+0 . I did notice that it was very light bodied and not what I normally drink. The company was Passenger coffee and the beans are Gesha Village . I was sent 2 lbs and I do not want to mess it up . What would you all suggest? I own v60 glass , kalita stainless, chemex , origami , nel drip , French press , aeropress and clever dripper. Also using basic 3rd wave water.

Thanks

Jeff
Team HB

#2: Post by Jeff »

The Passenger coffees I've had have been light or medium-light roasts. Their roasts have generally been of good quality. Between the roast level and the coffee itself, I'd expect a light body, delicately flavored cup, with some brightness (acidity) to it. If you're used to medium or darker roasts, you might find it more tea-like than "coffee" as it probably won't have any roast flavors.

I don't know if you've got their washed ("wet") or "natural" ("dry") processed variant. Washed coffees tend to be a little more delicate in their flavors. Natural processed ones ferment for a bit as they dry with the fruit still on the bean and often get some tropical fruit flavors. Neither is "better" than the other, though something to watch when you can to decide if you have a strong preference one way or another. From https://www.passengercoffee.com/collect ... ha-village it looks like the natural might be more of a medium-light, compared to the washed.

Ethiopian coffees seem to be a little fussy as they seem to grind with a lot of fines. When I've made V60s with them, the draw-down times seem to be a bit longer than other coffees. If you're used to darker roasts, you might try finer grind and possibly higher brew temperature if the cup is sour rather than just bright.

DamianWarS

#3: Post by DamianWarS »

sassypants15 wrote:Hello.

I was gifted some gesha coffee and I used a basic recipe with a kalita wave . I used my kinu grinder at 4+2+0 . I did notice that it was very light bodied and not what I normally drink. The company was Passenger coffee and the beans are Gesha Village . I was sent 2 lbs and I do not want to mess it up . What would you all suggest? As far as droppers , I own v60 glass , kalita stainless, chemex , origami , nel drip , French press , aeropress and clever dripper. Also using basic 3rd wave water.

Thanks
I would contact passenger and ask them. new coffee can be a bit of trial and error especially if you're not used to it. the guys who roasted it have an invested interest in your enjoyment because they want a repeat customer (especially if this was a gift then you would be a potential new customer). I would ask them things like grind size, ratio, water temperature and preferred brewing method (it seems you have a bit of everything) and tell them what equipment you're working with also you might want to ask them what water they use/recommend as well. they have some brew guides for Aeropress, Chemex, "single cup pourover" (picture of a kalita wave) and press so perhaps assume if they mention one of these brew types they are going to mean their own method posted on their website. review their methods and see what may be different than you're own and consider adjusting. They definitely will be cupping their roast but they may be noting other brew types as well or someone could reply that has more experience with the coffee you have to recommend what works for them.

PassengerCoffee

#4: Post by PassengerCoffee »

Hey hello!
Did you get the washed Gesha Village?
We really enjoy using an Aeropress at our coffee bars and we grind pretty fine when using it.

Our roasting style is quite light compared to a lot of US roasters - and that coffee (especially if it is the washed) is very delicate, light, more tea like! Lots of citrus and melon and crisp tea like qualities. Our goal in roasting is to stay completely out of the way so you don't taste any roast whatsoever - just the natural beauty and essence of the coffee.
Also enjoy using a Kalita Wave - we have a recipe listed online as well (https://www.passengercoffee.com/pages/brew-guides)

Temperature can be 210 or just off boil,
Drip time for a Kalita would most likely average 5-6 minutes depending on the grind size. If it get clogged and seems to look muddy - try a little coarser.

As far as water goes - 3rd wave water provides a much higher TDS than we tend to prefer for our coffees. Average TDS at our shops/roastery is 20-30. If using 3rd wave water perhaps dilute a small sample of water before heating up and using for this coffee to see what you think!

Please feel free to reach out through our website with any other questions!

sassypants15 (original poster)

#5: Post by sassypants15 (original poster) »

I believe I have the dry beans. Currently I decided to brew with the kalita using the gabi . I also did a brew with the v60 and cafec filters and both were great, but the gabi /kalita was very light. Thanks for all the help.

jmotzi

#6: Post by jmotzi »

You also don't have to be afraid of Gesha as if it's some fragile toy. I find all this talk about tea-like, etc. sometimes misleading.

I recently had some Finca El Injerto Malawi Gesha Natural Processed from Elixr. I thought it was fantastic using a combination of immersion & drip in the V60 at 1:10 (15g coffee + 185g water yielding 155g beverage; 2.1% TDS) and also as espresso in my Cremina at 1:2.3 (15g in, 34.5 g out; 7.8% TDS). Neither beverage could be described as weak and the flavors were fantastic. Leaving some beverage at the end to drink at room temperature revealed even more flavors. I have no doubt that all of those flavors would hold up in a more dilute preparation.

Enjoy!
LMWDP #662

Rustic39

#7: Post by Rustic39 »

My experience with the Geisha picked up in Panama last year was at first disappointing. Going into it not knowing what to expect, my first sample was brewed in a french press. First impressions were a tea like, weakish drink that I didn't particularly care for. I tried as a normal drip too, while experimenting with dose, and was always left wanting more body. Near the end of my trial Lb., I used it as a low dose espresso, and that's when I hit the mark. Wow! I bet Geisha would make a very interesting Turkish coffee, and moka too.

Jeff
Team HB

#8: Post by Jeff »

This is an Ethiopian, not a Central American transplant.

Rustic39

#9: Post by Rustic39 »

Given that SO coffees can easily demonstrate various cup profiles from one farm to the next, I'm curious how an Ethiopian Geisha is significantly distinct from a better Panamanian Geisha? The OP description of his sounds like there's much in common btwn the two regional versions.
I imagine the Ethiopian might tolerate a higher brew temp. Just guessing.

DamianWarS

#10: Post by DamianWarS »

sassypants15 wrote:I believe I have the dry beans. Currently I decided to brew with the kalita using the gabi . I also did a brew with the v60 and cafec filters and both were great, but the gabi /kalita was very light. Thanks for all the help.image
dry processed (also known as natural processed) is a method of processing coffee by drying the whole fruit (with coffee beans inside) and spreading them out in thin beds, rotating/raking them periodically until dry and it can be a challenge to get consistent results. to the coffee fruit (or coffee berry) this is akin to a grape turning into a raisin. After drying the dried fruit/skin is removed and hulled before shipping and may appear indistinguishable to a wet processed coffee. typically the cup is more fruity and less acidic than wet processed coffee (also known as washed coffee) and they have a more pronounced fermentation. you can often tell the difference simply by smelling the beans to know if they are naturals. I enjoy immersion brewing methods with naturals and I think the fuller body that immersion provides compliments the fruity and fermented characteristics of natures. I would treat it like any other coffee roast in the same way and adjust based on taste.