Espro P3 press

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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slipchuck
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Postby slipchuck » Sep 12, 2017, 5:29 pm

I just ordered the P3 and was wondering what kind of taste I can expect?
Would it be close to drip?
My wife doesn't like a coffee that's to bitter so any thoughts greatly appreciated
Using it mainly for camping but if it's really good likely for home as well.
Is it better for light roast?

Thanks
Randy
The only bad decisions are the decisions you didn't make

RyanJE
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Postby RyanJE » Sep 12, 2017, 6:26 pm

It will probably taste like a french press. Most likely whatever coffee you put in it will taste like that coffee. :P
I drink two shots before I drink two shots, then I drink two more....

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Randy G.
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Postby Randy G. » Sep 12, 2017, 9:46 pm

It won't taste like French Press. The filter system in virtually every other French press lets through a lot of fines (the "sludge" in the bottom of the cup) which creates bitterness. The Espro filter system is so far advanced that it makes the "traditional" press pot obsolete (IMO).
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Boldjava
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Postby Boldjava » Sep 12, 2017, 10:09 pm

You will get the oils that you find in a traditional press pot without the sludge. Clean but heavy oily cup. Cup is more structured than a press pot. Had one today. As Randy said, traditional press pot is now obsolete.
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slipchuck
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Postby slipchuck » Sep 13, 2017, 7:20 pm

Since there is a finer screen then traditional French press is it of advantage to grind finer? If so what would be the closest comparison? (example coarse salt)

Thanks

Randy
The only bad decisions are the decisions you didn't make

MikeTheBlueCow
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Postby MikeTheBlueCow » Sep 13, 2017, 10:00 pm

slipchuck wrote:Since there is a finer screen then traditional French press is it of advantage to grind finer? If so what would be the closest comparison? (example coarse salt)

Thanks

Randy


I have the Espro Travel Press. I made a 20:300 brew with a normal drip grind (considerably finer than a normal press grind) and the total brew time was 3 minutes. I don't like to make comparisons like "sea salt", etc. because I swear everyone has a different opinion about what that actually means (and every company that makes sea salt might use a different particle size when they process it...). It also depends on the coffee, solubility, density, roast, desired notes, etc.

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Boldjava
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Postby Boldjava » Sep 13, 2017, 10:13 pm

My Espro grind is midway between my press pot grind and my pourover grinds.
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MikeTheBlueCow
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Postby MikeTheBlueCow » Sep 14, 2017, 11:17 am

Actually I want to follow up on my previous comment and say that I've used this same grind size in a cheap Ikea french press. If you stir about a minute before you press, the grinds settle a decent amount and I have not had a problem with pressing being harder or anything like that. Does not seem to produce more silt in the regular french press than a coarser grind with longer brew time. So my Espro process isn't really any different than my regular process. So yes, you can use a finer grind and shorter brew time before pressing and it shouldn't be an issue. The filter is just better at removing the silt, and indeed my Espro cups have been silt free. However, about one sip is retained beneath the filter with the grounds (at least in my travel espro, which you can't see into and I didn't know it was there until I opened it to clean it). Not really sure I recommend the travel espro since it holds such a small volume; unless you make a stronger ratio...

There are paper filters you can use which will make the taste more similar to drip. But immersion will still have some differences from drip; however they might be minor.

MikeTheBlueCow wrote:I have the Espro Travel Press. I made a 20:300 brew with a normal drip grind (considerably finer than a normal press grind) and the total brew time was 3 minutes. I don't like to make comparisons like "sea salt", etc. because I swear everyone has a different opinion about what that actually means (and every company that makes sea salt might use a different particle size when they process it...). It also depends on the coffee, solubility, density, roast, desired notes, etc.

jpender
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Postby jpender » Sep 14, 2017, 1:58 pm

MikeTheBlueCow wrote:However, about one sip is retained beneath the filter with the grounds (at least in my travel espro, which you can't see into and I didn't know it was there until I opened it to clean it). Not really sure I recommend the travel espro since it holds such a small volume; unless you make a stronger ratio...


I have the travel Espro as well. I bought it as a "12 ounce" press without taking the time to read more carefully. It actually makes a much smaller volume, maybe 8-9oz. I was routinely overfilling mine and causing a mess, trying to get a larger amount out of it.

So now I usually do two things: First, I use more coffee and then dilute the result with hot water. Second, I do the little trick where, after plunging, you carefully pull the plunger up again partway, invert the press, and then press the plunger again. This has the effect of forcing out most of the residual coffee. You do get a bit of fine silt that way too, though.

As a travel mug I found it unpleasant to drink out of and too small an amount to bother carrying around. So for me it's just a small press. I'd rather have a larger one but I'm not going to spend what it costs for one of the larger Espros. Of course one can get clean results with a regular press simply by waiting a bit longer. James Hoffman did a video on that.

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slipchuck
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Postby slipchuck » Sep 14, 2017, 2:39 pm

jpender wrote:I have the travel Espro as well. I bought it as a "12 ounce" press without taking the time to read more carefully. It actually makes a much smaller volume, maybe 8-9oz. I was routinely overfilling mine and causing a mess, trying to get a larger amount out of it.

So now I usually do two things: First, I use more coffee and then dilute the result with hot water. Second, I do the little trick where, after plunging, you carefully pull the plunger up again partway, invert the press, and then press the plunger again. This has the effect of forcing out most of the residual coffee. You do get a bit of fine silt that way too, though.

As a travel mug I found it unpleasant to drink out of and too small an amount to bother carrying around. So for me it's just a small press. I'd rather have a larger one but I'm not going to spend what it costs for one of the larger Espros. Of course one can get clean results with a regular press simply by waiting a bit longer. James Hoffman did a video on that.

The high cost of the larger size is why I decided to give the P3 a try. Plastic and glass instead of steel is no issue for me.

Randy
The only bad decisions are the decisions you didn't make

 
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